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Homelessness among students increases 137% under Trump — the highest in years

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President Donald Trump spent $11 million on a campaign ad during the Super Bowl to tell the country he’s created the best economy in American history. But for the 1.5 million children struggling with homelessness in the United States, it isn’t exactly the case.

As Trump biographer David Cay Johnston explained Monday, the economy isn’t anything to brag about. The New York Times reported the results of a recent study from the National Center for Homeless Education showed that during the 2017-2018 school year, homelessness among students saw a 137 percent increase.

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“It was the highest number recorded in more than a dozen years, and experts said it reflected a growing problem that could negatively affect children’s academic performance and health,” the Times explained.

There are three main points of cause: first, is that the economy isn’t as great as the president thinks. Second, the impact of natural disasters was so serious that many children and their families were forced to live in hotels until disaster relief was granted to their area. Finally, one of the greatest problems is the opioid crisis, which the administration has been fighting with a tired “just say no” policy.

“The ripple effect here is real,” the Times cited Dr. Megan Sandel, director of the Grow Clinic at the Boston Medical Center. She explained that housing instability can cause developmental delays and account for poor health in children.

The survey compared the 2017-2018 school year to 2015-2016.

You can read the full report at The New York Times.

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2020 Election

Will Wednesday’s debate finally prove that Bloomberg is not Batman?

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After months of highly repetitive Democratic primary debates that, with pointless inevitability, turn into tedious squabbles over different health care plans that will never actually be passed in their proposed forms, there's finally going to be some real tension going into a debate again. That's because information billionaire and former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg is expected to show up tonight in Las Vegas, having purchased his way into the debate by infusing the airwaves and our very bloodstreams with a series of ads that are as inspiring as Bloomberg the man is not.

This article was originally published at Salon

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Paul Krugman debunks Trump’s bogus claims about the ‘Obama economy’

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President Donald Trump has repeatedly insisted that his policies alone are responsible for the economic recovery in the United States, claiming that he inherited a broken economy from his Democratic predecessor, President Barack Obama. But Trump’s claims are wildly misleading, and economist/New York Times columnist Paul Krugman debunked some of them this week in a Twitter thread.

Krugman tweeted, “So, I see that Trump is bad-mouthing the Obama economy. Two points. First, there was absolutely no break in economic trends after the 2016 election.”

The 66-year-old Krugman posted a chart showing GDP (gross domestic product) from 2010 (when Obama was serving his first term) to 2020 (three years into Trump’s presidency). GDP, the chart shows, gradually improved during Obama’s eight-year presidency.

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Right-wing extremists using Facebook to recruit for ‘boogaloo’ attacks on liberals and cops: report

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A right-wing extremist movement is recruiting on social media to target liberals and law enforcement in a violent uprising called the "boogaloo."

The loosely organized movement is trolling for members on mainstream platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Reddit and Twitter, in addition to 4chan and other fringe sites, to promote a second Civil War, reported NBC News.

“When you have people talking about and planning sedition and violence against minorities, police, and public officials, we need to take their words seriously,” said Paul Goldenberg, of the Homeland Security Advisory Council.

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