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Coronavirus stimulus bill would ban companies owned by Trump or his children from receiving bailout money

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A provision in the massive bill prohibits “businesses controlled by the president, vice president, members of Congress, and heads of executive departments from receiving loans or investments from Treasury programs.”

A massive coronavirus stimulus plan that the Senate and White House agreed to in the early hours of Wednesday morning would bar any companies owned or controlled by President Donald Trump, the president’s children, Vice President Mike Pence, or members of Congress from receiving any taxpayer bailout money, according to a summary of the legislation circulated by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.

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The sprawling $2 trillion bill, which has not yet been released in full, would “prohibit businesses controlled by the president, vice president, members of Congress, and heads of executive departments from receiving loans or investments from Treasury programs,” Schumer’s summary states.

“The children, spouses, and in-laws of the aforementioned principals are also included in this prohibition,” the document adds.

Trump in recent days has voiced his desire for the hotel industry to be among the corporate beneficiaries of any congressional stimulus legislation and—after being pressed repeatedly by reporters—has refused to vow that his own companies would not receive money from any taxpayer bailout programs.

The president also asserted that he will personally oversee the corporate bailout funds. “We’re going to make good deals,” Trump said during a press briefing on Monday.

“Several Trump-branded properties have been affected by the virus-induced demand crash, as well as state and local restrictions on going out in public,” Bloomberg reported Wednesday morning.

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Senate Democrats earlier this week stopped the GOP’s efforts to advance an earlier version of the stimulus bill in an effort to extract concessions from the White House and Senate Republicans, who Democrats accused of attempting to force through a corporate “slush fund” with little regard for workers.

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In negotiations with Senate Republicans and Trump administration officials, Democrats reportedly won inclusion of a significant boost in unemployment benefits (which would also be extended to gig workers), more money for hospitals, and independent oversight of a $500 billion corporate loan fund that the legislation would establish.

As the heated talks over the stimulus bill progressed Tuesday, progressive lawmakers expressed concerns about the enormous legislative package, which could hit the Senate floor for a vote as soon as Wednesday afternoon.

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“The developments of this Senate relief bill are concerning,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) tweeted Tuesday afternoon, before the Senate agreement was finalized. “We are hearing lots of vague statements, but not a single member of Congress has seen actual bill text. It seems to give a *HALF TRILLION DOLLARS* away to big corporations, with few worker protections. Half a trillion.”

With the House out of session and lawmakers wary of returning to Capitol Hill amid the coronavirus outbreak, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is expected to attempt to pass the Senate bill by unanimous consent, which requires the agreement of every member.

“If unanimous consent is not possible,” the Washington Post reported, “aides of both parties said the most likely scenario would be a day-long vote where members would be encouraged to spread out their trips to the floor and not congregate as the vote is taken.”

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Trump uses coronavirus briefing to tout pastor who said 9/11 attack was God punishing America

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During a press briefing today to address the nation's response to the coronavirus pandemic, President Trump was asked about certain Christian pastors who plan to defy state lockdown orders and hold Easter church services this Sunday.

"I've had talks with the pastors, and most of the pastors agree ... that they are better off doing what they are doing, which is, distancing," Trump said, adding that the pastors want to "get back to church so badly."

Trump then referred to a notorious pastor who sits on his religious advisory council.

"I'm going to be watching Pastor Robert Jeffress, who's been a great guy," Trump said. "He's a great guy and I'm going to be watching on a laptop."

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2020 Election

Trump slammed for ‘ridiculous’ ad trying to link Biden to the Chinese government

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On Friday, writing for The Washington Post, Greg Sargent tore apart President Donald Trump's "ridiculous" new attack ad trying to claim that Vice President Joe Biden is beholden to Chinese interests.

"The ad clips Biden’s words out of context to misleadingly imply that Biden criticized Trump’s decision to restrict travel from China, when that’s not what Biden did," wrote Sargent. "Second, the ad relies on numerous past quotes from Biden to demonstrate he’s supposedly been soft on China. But those quotes were mostly boilerplate diplomatic language — and Trump has repeatedly praised China in language very close to what Biden has used ... And third, the Asian man that Biden bowed to turns out to be Gary Locke, a former Washington governor and U.S. ambassador to China, an American."

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Trump rambles about ‘genius’ coronavirus during long-winded briefing: ‘The germ has gotten so brilliant’

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The leader of the free world rambled about his "brilliant enemy" during a coronavirus briefing that lasted over two hours.

Allies of the White House had been quoted in the press urging President Donald Trump to keep his remarks short, but that advice has apparently been ignored.

"When critics (and allies) make suggestions to him and they become public - such as the briefings ought to be shorter - POTUS often prefers to do the opposite. We're well past 90 minutes on this briefing," New York Times White House correspondent Maggie Haberman noted on Twitter as the briefing wore on.

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