Quantcast
Connect with us

Ex-CDC director: Worst-case scenario for coronavirus is 1.6 million Americans dead

Published

on

Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, Former Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Photo by New America

There are a wide range of possible endgames for the coronavirus pandemic in the United States. It is possible that the outbreak could prove limited and the death toll will not exceed the hundreds.

But according to the Washington Post, a former director of the Centers for Disease Control estimates that in, the very worst-case scenario, the total number of fatalities in America could exceed 1.6 million.

ADVERTISEMENT

“[One] forecast, developed by former CDC director Tom Frieden at the nonprofit organization Resolve to Save Lives, found that deaths in the United States could range widely, depending on what percentage of the population becomes infected and how lethal the disease proves to be,” reported the Post. “Frieden, who oversaw the U.S. response to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the 2014 Ebola epidemic and the 2016 Zika epidemic, says that in a worst-case scenario, but one that is not implausible, half the U.S. population would become infected and more than 1 million people would die.”

“His team put together a simple table that looks at various scenarios using case fatality ratios ranging from .1, similar to seasonal flu, to .5, a moderately severe pandemic, and 1.0, a severe one,” continued the Post. “The infection rate ranged from 0.1 percent of the population to 50 percent. That put the range of deaths at 327 (best case) to 1,635,000 (worst case). The deaths would not necessarily happen over a month or a year, but could occur over two or three years, he said.”

You can read more here.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump says he will name woman to succeed Ginsburg on Supreme Court

Published

on

With less than two months to go before the US election, galvanized Democrats are pushing back furiously on Trump's desire to 'to move quickly' on the nomination process

US President Donald Trump on Saturday said he would nominate a woman to succeed late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The president's desire to "to move quickly" on the process, despite Democrats' vehement opposition, is likely to dominate the campaigns – alongside other hot-button issues such as the coronavirus and America's ongoing racial reckoning – ahead of the November 3 election.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Moscow slams ‘illegitimate’ US claims on Iran sanctions

Published

on

The Russian foreign ministry on Sunday condemned the unilateral declaration by the United States that UN sanctions on Iran are back in force as "illegitimate" and "unacceptable".

"The illegitimate initiatives and actions of the United States by definition cannot have international legal consequences for other countries," the foreign ministry said in a statement.

Russia, a key ally of Iran, accused Washington of putting on a "theatrical performance" and insisted that the US statements "do not correspond to reality."

It accused the US of "trying to force everyone to wear virtual reality goggles" and accept its version of events, adding: "The world is not an American computer game."

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Democrat Teresa Greenfield leads GOP Sen. Joni Ernst in ‘Gold Standard’ poll of Iowa

Published

on

The Des Moines Register released their latest polling of Iowa on Saturday.

"Democrat Theresa Greenfield leads Republican U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst by 3 percentage points in a Senate race that appears to be among the most competitive in the country," the newspaper reported. "With just over six weeks to Election Day, the new Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll shows Greenfield leading 45% to 42% among likely voters. Another 3% say they would vote for someone else, 2% say they would not vote in the race and 7% are unsure."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage.  Help us deliver it.  Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free. LEARN MORE