Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump tells aides he can’t forgive Pelosi for impeachment humiliation as their broken relationship threatens COVID-19 response: report

Published

on

Nancy Pelosi rips up Trump's State of the Union speech with him standing right in front of her (CNN)

Donald Trump and Nancy Pelosi haven’t spoken in five months, and some are worrying if their dysfunctional relationship is hindering the federal government’s ability to combat the growing coronavirus pandemic, according to a new report from the Associated Press.

Trump is angry about the House’s impeachment effort against him, and even unifying effect of a disease outbreak isn’t thawing the ice between the two. “Trump and Pelosi communicated with — or at — each other via Twitter and television or through intermediaries the other side could tolerate,” writes the Associated Press. “Chief among them has been Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who personally negotiated the three rescue bills passed so far. When Trump signed the package at the White House, he did not invite Pelosi or any other Democrats to join him.”

ADVERTISEMENT

According to the Associated Press, Trump has told aides and confidants “he feels as if Pelosi has tried to undermine and humiliate him at every turn and he will never forgive her for impeachment, according to two White House aides and Republicans close to the West Wing.”

With a record 6.6 million people filing for unemployment, a fresh urgency has been added to calls for another stimulus bill — a process that Pelosi suggested she’ll be involved in with minimal communication with Trump.

“Whatever communications we need to move forward, that will be happening whether I talk to the president or not,” Pelosi said. “It’s not casual. It isn’t, ‘Let’s just chat.’ It’s about what is the purpose, what is the urgency, does it require the time of the speaker and the president, both of whom are very busy people.”

Speaking to the Associated Press, Rep. Ben McAdams (D-UT) suggested that the American people might not have the patience for all the partisan bickering during such uncertain times.

“There’s no space for politics,” McAdams of Utah, who is recovering from the coronavirus, said. “Really, we have to come together and work together to save lives, and that is the only thing that matters right now.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Read the full report over at the Associated Press.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Expert breaks down the ultimate goal of Trump’s ‘classic Russian-style disinformation campaign’

Published

on

Jonathan Rauch, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, spoke with CNN's Brian Stelter on Sunday to explain the ultimate goal of President Donald Trump's false accusations of a rigged and stolen election.

Rauch was asked by Stelter if the issue is Trump is simply trapped in the delusion that he actually beat President-elect Joe Biden in the 2020 election.

"Is delusion a fair word for these election lies?" Stelter wondered.

"No, actually, I don't think it is," Rauch replied. "It's hard to know what's going on in the mind of the president, but you don't really need to. What you need to know is that what he is running right now is a classic Russian-style disinformation campaign of a type known as the firehose of falsehood. That's when you utilize every channel, not just media, but also the bully pulpit, even litigation to push out as many different stories and conspiracy theories and lies and half-truths as you possibly can in order to flood the zone if with disinformation."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Inside the spread of conspiracies and disinformation by women on social media

Published

on

“The QAnon stuff infiltrated Instagram and seeped into the suburban consciousness of American women to a certain extent, and they bought into it,” according to experts.

Originally published by The 19th

Since the internet’s advent, conspiracy theories have acquired followings online. Now, in the era of social media, people use platforms like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to spread disinformation and misinformation. Instagram, the Facebook-owned image platform where influencers tout luxury, beauty and consumer culture, has also become an online home for conspiracies. And lately, one has been particularly prolific: QAnon.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

More than one dozen Trump officials violated Hatch Act in month before the election

Published

on

Although President Donald Trump has tried to undermine the United States' system of checks and balances, watchdogs in Washington, D.C. have been keeping a close eye on him — and according to the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, 16 members of the Trump Administration committed violations of the Hatch Act in order to promote his reelection campaign in October.

In an article published on CREW's website on Monday, November 2 — the day before the 2020 presidential election — CREW reporters Donald K. Sherman and Linnaea Honl-Stuenkel explain, "during the month of October, at least 16 Trump Administration officials have violated the Hatch Act a total of more than 60 times, in an unprecedented and escalating assault on the rule of law and the democratic process. President Trump has allowed — and encouraged — senior officials to use their government roles to take actions benefiting his reelection effort in its final weeks and days as Americans are casting their ballots."

Continue Reading