Quantcast
Connect with us

Kellyanne Conway voted by mail — before opposing it for other voters: report

Published

on

On Wednesday, Kellyanne Conway said voting by mail should not be universal, adding that people should be willing to wait in lines to vote during a pandemic if they are willing to wait in hour-long lines at Georgetown Cupcake. People were swift to point out the flaws in her argument, including that cupcakes are not a constitutional right and that Georgetown Cupcake is actually not allowing people to stand in line right now.

ADVERTISEMENT

But there’s another problem. On Thursday, the Huffington Post reported that Conway herself voted by mail in the 2018 midterm elections.

“Conway was apparently unwilling to make that time commitment herself on Nov. 6, 2018, when she voted by mail, according to the Bergen County supervisor of elections,” reported S.V. Date and Roque Planas. “Conway, who with her husband continues to own a home in northern New Jersey, tried to draw a distinction between an absentee ballot and a mail ballot, although many states — including New Jersey ― have no such distinction and allow voters to cast ballots by mail without having to assert that they will be out of town.”

“That’s called an absentee ballot. One completes it and posts it by U.S. Mail,” Conway wrote in an email when HuffPost reporters reached out to her. “Don’t confuse it with a (non-absentee) ‘mail-in ballot’ to serve your purposes.”

Yesterday, it also emerged that White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, who has also echoed the White House’s opposition to mail-in ballots, voted by mail 11 times in the last decade. And Trump himself, meanwhile, has also cast a vote by mail in Florida — a state that allows anyone to do so with no excuse — even though he has repeatedly traveled to the state throughout his presidency.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump pal Ron DeSantis blasted as a ‘spoiled child’ for treating Floridians like ‘third-class citizens’

Published

on

Local politicians in Florida had harsh words for Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis after the mayor of Hialeah was reportedly left out of a meeting on the state's COVID-19 outbreak.

"The mayor of Hialeah, the second-largest city in Miami-Dade County, said Tuesday that he was denied entry to a roundtable that Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis held with several city mayors to discuss the COVID-19 pandemic," the Miami Herald reported Tuesday.

"Hialeah Mayor Carlos Hernandez said he didn’t receive an invitation, but Miami Mayor Francis Suarez informed him the roundtable was taking place. When Hernandez tried to walk in, he told the Miami Herald, a member of the governor’s staff told him he wasn’t invited and couldn’t enter," the newspaper reported.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump lashes out at reporter after being asked about deaths of Black people from cops

Published

on

President Donald Trump lashed out at a CBS News reporter who asked why Black Americans are still being killed by law enforcement.

"So are white people. What a terrible question to ask," Trump replied to CBS's Catherine Herridge. "More White people, by the way. More White people."

A 2016 study showed that a disproportionate amount of people of color are killed by police, nearly three times more (2.8 percent) than Black Americans are killed by police than whites.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump is unraveling before our eyes — and the next four months could be particularly dangerous: Mental health experts

Published

on

Donald Trump on Friday commuted the sentence of his crony, Roger Stone.  As Mitt Romney tweeted, "Unprecedented historic corruption: an American president commutes the sentence of a person  convicted by a jury of lying to shield that very president."

So the president of the United States takes action to help his buddy, a convicted felon, but he cannot take decisive steps to combat the coronavirus pandemic and save lives. This is an act of corruption of the highest order. And this is an example of Donald Trump's mental disorder and a stark preview of his unraveling over the next four months leading up to the November election.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image