Quantcast
Connect with us

Intel agencies hire outside consultants to study how to get Trump to understand national security info

Published

on

US President Donald Trump speaks about the impeachment inquiry during a tour of the Flextronics computer manufacturing facility in Austin, Texas (AFP Photo/MANDEL NGAN)

U.S. Intelligence agencies have been forced to hire outside consultants to study how to present vital national security information to President Donald Trump in a way he will understand the data, The New York Times reports.

Trump, unlike most presidents, is infamous for not reading his daily briefing materials or even paying attention during his oral briefings, now just two or three days a week. But unlike most presidents, Trump prefers to rely on conversations he has with close friends instead of information collected by the nation’s top spies and intelligence professionals.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The president veers off on tangents and getting him back on topic is difficult,” The Times adds, citing former intelligence officials. “He has a short attention span and rarely, if ever, reads intelligence reports, relying instead on conservative media and his friends for information. He is unashamed to interrupt intelligence officers and riff based on tips or gossip he hears from the former casino magnate Steve Wynn, the retired golfer Gary Player or Christopher Ruddy, the conservative media executive.”

President Trump “rarely absorbs information that he disagrees with or that runs counter to his worldview, the officials said. Briefing him has been so great a challenge compared with his predecessors that the intelligence agencies have hired outside consultants to study how better to present information to him.”

Trump’s inability and lack of interest in understanding the forces that daily threaten America’s 3.8 million square miles and nearly 330 million people was never more an issue than at the start of the coronavirus pandemic. To date, nearly 100,000 Americans have died from the virus.

Studies, including one released Wednesday, show that had President Trump acted just one week earlier, 36,000 lives would have been saved.

But Trump “has insisted that the intelligence agencies gave him inadequate warnings about the threat of the virus, describing it as ‘not a big deal,'” The Times notes, referring to a January 23 briefing.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump blamed that questionable claim on “a C.I.A. analyst with three decades of experience.” He also “ignored a host of warnings he received around that time from higher-ranking officials, epidemiologists, scientists, biodefense officials, other national security aides and the news media about the virus’s growing threat. Mr. Trump’s own health secretary had alerted him five days earlier to the potential seriousness of the virus.”

Despite all the early warnings about the impending global pandemic, “Trump balked at further measures that might have slowed its spread.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

The Arab uprisings were weakened by online fakes

Published

on

The Arab uprisings a decade ago were supercharged by online calls to join the protests -- but the internet was soon flooded with misinformation, weakening the region's cyber-activists.

When Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled the country in January 2011, rumours and uncertainty created "panic and hysteria", said ex-activist and entrepreneur Houeida Anouar.

"January 14 was a horrible night, so traumatic," she said. "We heard gunfire, and a neighbour shouted 'hide yourselves, they're raping women'."

As pro-regime media pumped out misinformation, the flood of bogus news also spread to the internet, a space activists had long seen as a refuge from censorship and propaganda.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Dr. Fauci warns of post-Thanksgiving COVID-19 surge in US

Published

on

The United States is the worst-affected country, with 266,074 Covid-19 deaths, and President Donald Trump's administration has issued conflicting messages on mask-wearing, travel and the danger posed by the virus.

"There almost certainly is going to be an uptick because of what has happened with the travel," Fauci told CNN's "State of the Union."

Travel surrounding Thursday's Thanksgiving holiday made this the busiest week in US airports since the pandemic began.

"We may see a surge upon a surge" in two or three weeks, Fauci added. "We don't want to frighten people, but that's the reality."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Sidney Powell’s new election lawsuit cites election experts she won’t even name: legal expert

Published

on

President Donald Trump's former election lawyer, Sidney Powell, has filed her lawsuit in Georgia suing Gov. Brian Kemp (R-GA) for what she says is a fraudulent election.

But lawyer Mike Dunford explained that it doesn't exactly work that way. Reading through Powell's court document "Emergency Motion for Declaratory, Emergency, and Permanent Injunctive Relief and Memorandum in Support Thereof."

"If you want emergency relief it is very helpful to be as clear and concise as humanly possible," he explained. "Pointing the court back to your 100+ page complaint with its 29 exhibits isn't how that is best done. To put it very mildly."

Continue Reading