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Franklin Graham fumes over SCOTUS ruling: My rights to fire LGBTQ people ‘are the freedoms our nation was founded on’

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Anti-LGBTQ activist Franklin Graham is furious over Monday’s Supreme Court ruling that finds Title Vii of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects LGBTQ workers from discrimination, and says America was founded on his right to fire them.

“As a Bible-believing follower of Jesus Christ, my rights should be protected,” Graham writing on Facebook about the SCOTUS decision, insists. “Even if my sincerely held religious beliefs might be the minority, I still have a right to hold them. The same holds true for a Christian organization. These are the freedoms our nation was founded on.”

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“I believe this decision erodes religious freedoms across this country,” the evangelical Christian preacher continued. “People of sincere faith who stand on God’s Word as their foundation for life should never be forced by the government to compromise their religious beliefs.”

That’s just plain false. For example, it’s also the argument pedophile polygamist Warren Jeffs, President of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints made. The courts disagreed. (The FLDS is not the Mormon Church.)

Graham wasn’t finished.

“Christian organizations should never be forced to hire people who do not align with their biblical beliefs and should not be prevented from terminating a person whose lifestyle and beliefs undermine the ministry’s purpose and goals,” he added.

Graham also falsely characterized the Supreme Court’s historic ruling, claiming it “enacted a new law that adds sexual orientation and gender identity to the 1964 Civil Rights Act as ‘protected classes.'”

That, too, is just plain false.

What the SCOTUS justices did was what other courts for more than a decade had already done: understand and realize that anti-LGBTQ discrimination is sex discrimination. They didn’t “enact a new law,” they recognized the existing law already protects LGBTQ people.

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Ironically, Graham linked to an excellent Rolling Stone article announcing the Court’s landmark ruling. It ends by calling it “a victory for LGBTQ people and for all Americans who care about justice and fairness.”

 

 


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Here’s what you need to know about Bill Stepien — the man who just took over Trump’s fledgling campaign

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President Donald Trump announced that his campaign manager, Brad Parscale, is being shoved out of his role given the failures the campaign has suffered over the past seven months.

In his place, for now, at least, will be Bill Stepien.

If that name sounds familiar, it may be because Stepien was part of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's Bridgegate scandal, where, as punishment to Mayor Mark Sokolich, two of three toll lanes were closed during a Monday morning rush hour and weren't reopened until Friday.

The court case quoted Bill Stepien's name over 700 times, including an email in which he claimed, "It will be a tough November for this little Serbian." The mayor was born in Fort Lee, and his lineage isn't Serbian, it's actually Croatian.

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Anti-corruption group files motion in Roger Stone case saying pardon is void due to ‘self dealing’

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The anti-corruption group Free Speech for the People filed a motion with Judge Amy Berman Jackson opposing the pardon of President Donald Trump's pal, Roger Stone.

According to the organization's president, John Bonifaz, there are "limits to the pardon power" that the president holds, "including when the power is abused for self-dealing purposes." He said that Stone's "commutation violates the Take Care Clause of the Constitution," and thus, should be declared void.

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A delay in Trump finance scandal may prevent the prosecution of other people than the president: court filing

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President Donald Trump is continuing to fight the Manhattan District Attorney's case requiring his taxes and financial documents. But in a Wednesday court filing Cy Vance indicated that there is a need for urgency because his case could involve the prosecution of "other people."

Time is of the essence to minimize "any risk that criminal conduct will go unpunished," says Vance in the filing.

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