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Huge victory for LGBT rights as Supreme Court extends the Civil Rights Act to cover sexual orientation and gender identity

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In a 6-3 Supreme Court decision, with President Donald Trump’s nominee Neil Gorsuch writing the majority opinion with progressive justices, the Court has ruled that sexual orientation and gender identity is protected under the Civil Rights Act.

The case was about people who could get married over the weekend and still be fired on Monday for their sexual orientation. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 fully covers such individuals, the Court ruled.

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The dissenters were Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and Brett Kavanaugh. The fact that Kavanaugh was one of the dissenters is going to cause problems for Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), who is up for reelection in Maine. She gave Kavanaugh a pass, when he told her he believed in existing case law on several issues.

“An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex,” Gorsuch wrote. “Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title VII forbids.”

“When an employer fires an employee because she is homosexual or transgender, two casual factors may be in play– both the individuals sex and something else (the sex to which the individual is attracted or with which the individual identifies). But Title VII doesn’t care. If an employer would not have discharged an employee but for that individual’s sex, the statue’s causation standard is met, and liability may attach,” he also wrote.

“[I]t is impossible to discriminate against a person for being homosexual or transgender without discriminating against that individual based on sex,” Gorsuch also said.

In the case, Aimee Stephens, a trans woman was fired from a funeral home where she worked when she came out saying that she would live the rest of her life as a woman. Stephens has since passed away, not living to see the ruling. In the LGBQ portion of the ruling, Gerald Bostock, an award-winning child social services coordinator in Georgia, was fired after it was discovered he joined a gay softball league.

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The oral argument claimed that the law was passed in 1964 and the opposition said that there were homosexual people and the law could have included those individuals then if it intended to. The legal team for the opposing side demolished the argument by saying that many things weren’t laws in 1964 like sexual harassment, which people now view as illegal.

In the dissent, Justice Alito outright attacked Gorsuch, saying that he was betraying Scalia with his ruling.

“The Court attempts to pass off its decision as the inevitable product of the textualist school of statutory interpretation championed by our late colleague Justice Scalia, but no one should be fooled. The Court’s opinion is like a pirate ship. It sails under a textualist flag, but what it actually represents is a theory of statutory interpretation that Justice Scalia excoriated–the theory that courts should ‘update’ old statutes so that they better reflect the current values of society. See A. Scalia, A Matter of Interpretation 22,” the dissent read.

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2020 Election

Brad Parscale mocked over demotion: ‘Apparently there is a limit to how much you can grift’

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On Wednesday, President Donald Trump announced on Facebook that campaign manager Brad Parscale has been demoted, after several months of a reportedly rocky relationship and frustration from the president over his sinking poll numbers.

Commenters on social media buried Parscale in mockery over the news.

Irony: Brad Parscale just got demoted on Facebook. pic.twitter.com/HZ2jWVS5iJ

— The Hoarse Whisperer (@HoarseWisperer) July 16, 2020

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WATCH: TikTok comedian trolls anti-Black Lives Matter protester outside Trump Tower

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In a viral video, Walter Masterson, a comedian on the social media site TikTok, walked up to an anti-Black Lives Matter demonstrator outside Trump Tower and trolled him.

The demonstrator sported a Make America Great Again hat and a sign that read, "The only time Black lives matter is when they are shot by a white policeman or an Oreo cookie — defend all policemen!!!!" "Oreo," which in this context was meant to imply a Black police officer, is a racist slur sometimes used to mean a Black person who acts white. But Masterson decided to take it literally.

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Brad Parscale out as Trump campaign manager

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As President Donald Trump's polling numbers continue to fall, Brad Parscale has been removed as campaign manager.

Parscale, who has scored millions from the Trump campaign for his several companies over the past four years was promoted to the position, but after low rally turnout in Tulsa, Oklahoma, disastrous PR and sagging polls, Parscale is being replaced by Bill Stepien.

Trump made the announcement on Facebook since Twitter appeared to be down for anyone with a blue checkmark, including the president.

"This one should be a lot easier as our poll numbers are rising fast, the economy is getting better, vaccines and therapeutics will soon be on the way, and Americans want safe streets and communities!" Trump typed.

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