Quantcast
Connect with us

Republican Rand Paul is still holding up a bill that would make lynching a federal hate crime

Published

on

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) speaking with supporters in Salem New Hampshire during his unsuccessful bid to be the 2016 GOP presidential nominee. Photo by Gage Skidmore.

Congress is primed to pass a law that would make lynching a federal crime. But Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) is holding it up from a vote in the Senate, the Washington Post reported.

There are already laws in place that would make it a hate crime to target someone because of their color, their religion or their gender. Yet, violent hate crimes at the hands of a mob aren’t always considered hate crimes.

ADVERTISEMENT

For hate crimes, it has to be proven that the reason for the crime was inspired by race, religion, orientation, gender, etc. Making a lynching a hate crime would mean any group of people trying to kill someone would have that same distinction.

Paul may oppose it, but his move is blocking the law from even coming to a vote where he could vote for or against it.

“We think that lynching is an awful thing that should be roundly condemned, that should be universally condemned,” Paul said at the Capitol.

He tried to claim that the bill could “conflate lesser crimes with lynching,” which he said would be a “disservice to those who were lynched in our history” and result in “a new 10-year penalty for people who have minor bruising.”

“We don’t think that’s appropriate, and someone has to read these bills and make sure they do what they say they’re going to do rather than it be just a big PR effort, and then everybody gets up in arms and wants to beat up anybody who wants to read the bill, and actually make the bill strong,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Paul said he wants to edit the bill so it would only qualify “serious bodily injury standard” that would only make it a hate crime if it’s a “substantial risk of death and extreme physical pain.”

It’s unclear how many lynchings have not been a “substantial risk of death and extreme physical pain,” but Paul didn’t clarify.

Read the full report.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Rosh Hashanah services interrupted by death of the first Jewish woman on the Supreme Court

Published

on

The death of the first Jewish woman on the U.S. Supreme Court interrupted Rosh Hashanah services on Friday evening.

"On Friday, Jewish people around the country celebrating Rosh Hashanah were stunned to learn that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a prominent member of their own tribe, had died," the HuffPost reported. "People received alerts, Zoom messages and announcements from their rabbis about Ginsburg Friday night."

While many people were saddened by the passing of the iconic jurist, Twitter user Leora Horwitz noted a silver lining.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

‘Big mistake’: Trump’s favorite pollster tells Fox News why Republicans shouldn’t push nomination before the election

Published

on

Fox News on Friday examined why it would be a "big mistake" for Republicans to attempt to force through a nominee to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

Following Ginsburg's death, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) vowed that Trump's nominee would receive a vote, but did not specify whether it would occur before the election or during the "lame duck" session of Congress that occurs before the 2020 election victors are sworn in.

But conservative pollster Scott Rasmussen warned Republicans it would be a bad idea during an appearance with Fox News personality Laura Ingraham.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

LISTEN: Mourners sing ‘Amazing Grace’ outside the Supreme Court to celebrate Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Published

on

Heartwarming videos were shared on social media on Friday night showing the spontaneous gathering at the Supreme Court following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The large crowd, with many people wearing masks, sang the hymn "Amazing Grace."

Here are some of the videos of the scene:

A moving moments as dozens join in to sing “Amazing Grace” on the steps of the Supreme Court. pic.twitter.com/NGZyZi4YR4

— Mike Balsamo (@MikeBalsamo1) September 19, 2020

Continue Reading