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Queen’s letters on Australian PM’s sacking to be released in full

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Queen Elizabeth II’s correspondence on her role in the 1975 sacking of Australian prime minister Gough Whitlam will be released next week, it was announced Thursday, after a lengthy battle to make the documents public.

The British monarch’s representative in Australia, governor-general John Kerr, sparked a constitutional crisis in 1975 when he dismissed Whitlam, the popular leader of the centre-left Labor party, three years after his election.

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Australia’s High Court ruled in May that more than 200 letters between the queen and Kerr over the controversial affair should be part of the public record after her representatives had successfully kept them secret for decades.

The National Archives of Australia said Thursday it would release the correspondence — amounting to over 1,000 pages known as the “Palace Letters” — on July 14 with no redactions.

“The National Archives has examined the records for public release under the provisions of the Archives Act 1983 and I have determined all items will be released in full,” director-general David Fricker said.

Many of the 212 letters have attachments including newspaper clippings and other reports relating to Kerr’s work as governor-general, Fricker added.

The letters could help show if the British government tried to influence events in its former colony and what role the queen, Prince Charles and top royal advisers may have played.

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Local historian and Whitlam biographer Jennifer Hocking, who took the case to court in 2016, spent years arguing the texts were “extraordinarily significant historical documents” that should be made public, while the queen’s representatives had argued the correspondence was private.

Australia became independent in 1901, but the queen is still head of state. A referendum on becoming a republic failed in 1999.


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Oprah erects 26 billboards around Louisville — demanding the cops who killed Breonna Taylor get arrested

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Media mogul Oprah Winfrey continues to keep people talking about the killing of Breonna Taylor by the Louisville Metro Police Department.

"For the first time ever, just last week, Oprah Winfrey dedicated the cover of her magazine to someone other than herself -- Breonna Taylor. Now, that cover will be all over Louisville in the form of billboards big and small," WLKY-TV reported Thursday.

"She and the O Magazine team say they are amplifying Taylor's story and the fight for justice by erecting 26 billboards across the city. That's one for every year of her life," the station reported.

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Trump’s vendetta against TikTok is a veil for his anti-China and anti-free speech views

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Last week, President Donald Trump announced that he was planning on banning TikTok, a video-sharing social networking service owned by the Chinese company ByteDance. Shortly after he said this, the American multinational technology company Microsoft announced that it would attempt to purchase TikTok's US operations arm, although Trump has only given the company until Sept. 15 to pull this off.

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2020 Election

Eric Trump predicts his dad will win re-election: ‘The polls are looking great — you see it every day’

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One of President Donald Trump's children appeared on Fox News on Thursday to predict that his father would win re-election in November.

"Well listen, I think, um, I think we're looking really good," Eric Trump told Sean Hannity.

"The polls are looking great -- you see it every single day," Trump claimed. "The enthusiasm is tremendous."

"We're going to win," he predicted. "My father is going to win this election."

The prediction was offered the same day that NBC News released their first battleground map, showing Joe Biden on pace to win 334 Electoral College votes, Trump set to win 125 Electoral Votes, with 79 too close to call.

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