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Robert Mueller blasts commutation of Roger Stone’s sentence: ‘He remains a convicted felon’

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FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies during a House Appropriations Committee hearing on the FBI Budget, on Capitol Hill on March 19, 2013 in Washington, D.C. (UPI/Kevin Dietsch via Creative Commons)

Former special counsel Robert Mueller spoke out about President Donald Trump’s commutation of Roger Stone’s criminal conviction in an op-ed published online on Saturday by The Washington Post.

“The work of the special counsel’s office — its report, indictments, guilty pleas and convictions — should speak for itself. But I feel compelled to respond both to broad claims that our investigation was illegitimate and our motives were improper, and to specific claims that Roger Stone was a victim of our office. The Russia investigation was of paramount importance. Stone was prosecuted and convicted because he committed federal crimes. He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so,” Mueller wrote.

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“Russia’s actions were a threat to America’s democracy. It was critical that they be investigated and understood. By late 2016, the FBI had evidence that the Russians had signaled to a Trump campaign adviser that they could assist the campaign through the anonymous release of information damaging to the Democratic candidate. And the FBI knew that the Russians had done just that: Beginning in July 2016, WikiLeaks released emails stolen by Russian military intelligence officers from the Clinton campaign,” Mueller explained.

Mueller reminded why Stone was convicted.

“Congress also investigated and sought information from Stone. A jury later determined he lied repeatedly to members of Congress. He lied about the identity of his intermediary to WikiLeaks. He lied about the existence of written communications with his intermediary. He lied by denying he had communicated with the Trump campaign about the timing of WikiLeaks’ releases. He in fact updated senior campaign officials repeatedly about WikiLeaks. And he tampered with a witness, imploring him to stonewall Congress,” he wrote.

“The jury ultimately convicted Stone of obstruction of a congressional investigation, five counts of making false statements to Congress and tampering with a witness. Because his sentence has been commuted, he will not go to prison. But his conviction stands,” the former FBI director declared.

Read the full report.


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Racist goes berserk when Muslim asks him to keep aggressive dog on a leash

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A Pennsylvania man attacked his Muslim neighbor in a dispute over his aggressive dog.

Farrukh Abbas said he was walking through his apartment complex Sept. 7 in Upper Merion Township when a neighbor's dog ran up to him barking and growling, and he asked the owner to put the animal on a leash after it tried to attack him twice, reported WPVI-TV.

That's when the man, identified later as William Butler, started swearing at Abbas and telling him to go back to his country.

"Abusing, slurring, then he started using the racist remarks," Abbas said.

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‘Putin’s favorite congressman’ offered Julian Assange a pardon if he covered up Russian meddling: lawyers

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American prosecutors said this week that former Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) offered WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange a pardon from President Donald Trump if he agreed to help cover up Russia's role in interfering in the 2016 presidential election.

The Daily Beast reports that witness Jennifer Robinson has testified that she attended a meeting between Rohrabacher and Assange in 2017 in which he made a direct quid-pro-quo offer.

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A Republican witness gets humiliated when the author of a study he cited refutes him

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During a hearing on Thursday, September 17, Bharat Ramamurti of the Congressional Oversight Commission questioned Republican Chris Edwards on the benefits of federal aid to states. Edwards, during the hearing, questioned the benefits of that type of aid. But Ramamurti skillfully used a study that Edwards cited to make a case in favor of federal aid to states — not against it.

Ramamurti, a Democrat who was appointed to the Congressional Oversight Commission by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer earlier this year, noted that Edwards has claimed that a 2019 study by economics professor Valerie Rainey of the University of California shows that a dollar of federal aid to states results in less than a dollar of economic growth. And Edwards responded that yes, Rainey’s study did show that.

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