Quantcast
Connect with us

Ron DeSantis failed because his choices were ‘shaped by politics and divorced from scientific evidence’: report

Published

on

Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis was the focus of an in-depth Washington Post exposé examining why Florida is failing at coronavirus.

“As Florida became a global epicenter of the coronavirus, Gov. Ron DeSantis held one meeting this month with his top public health official, Scott Rivkees, according to the governor’s schedule. His health department has sidelined scientists, halting briefings last month with disease specialists and telling the experts there was not sufficient personnel from the state to continue participating,” the newspaper reported.

ADVERTISEMENT

The newspaper interviewed scores of sources for the story.

“As the virus spread out of control in Florida, decision-making became increasingly shaped by politics and divorced from scientific evidence according to interviews with 64 current and former state and administration officials, health administrators, epidemiologists, political operatives and hospital executives. The crisis in Florida, these observers say, has revealed the shortcomings of a response built on shifting metrics, influenced by a small group of advisers and tethered at every stage to the Trump administration, which has no unified plan for addressing the national health emergency but has pushed for states to reopen,” The Post explained.

DeSantis has largely ignored experts.

“DeSantis relies primarily on the advice of his wife, Casey, a former television reporter and host, and his chief of staff, Shane Strum, a former hospital executive, according to Republican political operatives, including a former member of his administration,” the newspaper noted.

The approach has resulted in widespread destruction.

“The response — which DeSantis boasted weeks ago was among the best in the nation — has quickly sunk Florida into a deadly morass. Nearly 5,800 Floridians have now died of covid-19, the disease caused by the virus — more deaths than were suffered in combat by Americans in Afghanistan or Iraq after 2001. One out of every 52 Floridians has been infected with the virus. The state’s intensive care units are being pushed to the brink, with some over capacity. Florida’s unemployment system is overwhelmed, and its tourism industry is a shambles,” the newspaper reported.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump, however, praised DeSantis in a statement.

“Ron DeSantis is doing a great job and will go down in history as a great governor of Florida,” Trump claimed.

Read the full report.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Arizona swing voters are rejecting Trump’s law-and-order attacks on Joe Biden: focus group

Published

on

A focus group of Arizona voters held by NPR has found that President Donald Trump's claims that former Vice President Joe Biden will abolish the police are falling flat.

The focus group showed voters a Trump campaign ad featuring a fictitious elderly woman frantically dialing 911 when an intruder entered her house -- only to be told that the entire police department had been defunded thanks to Biden.

However, even Trump voters in the focus group found the ad to be way over the top.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

If Trump loses two more states it’s ‘ballgame over’: AP reporter

Published

on

Appearing on MSNBC's " Morning Joe," Associated Press White House correspondent Jonathan Lemire explained Donald Trump's chances of being re-elected have reached the point where, if he loses the electoral votes of one more, he will be out of luck and out of office.

Speaking with co-host Joe Scarborough, Lemire was asked where Trump stands in the battleground states he so desperately needs.

"Both campaigns agree that there are six battleground states to decide this election: Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan, Arizona, North Carolina, Florida," he began. "Now the president has to play defense and has had to spend resources and had to go the past week to places like Ohio, Texas -- Georgia is another one where he has to play defense. We don't see, outside of perhaps New Hampshire, a place where Democrats have to do the same now that the Trump campaign has ceded Michigan."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump’s executive orders are confusing and unconstitutional — and likely to hurt his own voters. He doesn’t care.

Published

on

As we went into the weekend, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had washed his hands of the negotiations over the vitally necessary COVID-19 relief package, leaving Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and former Tea Party zealot turned White House chief of staff Mark Meadows to try to hash out a deal. Word was that the Democrats had come down from their demand for $3 trillion in various relief programs to $2 trillion, while the White House stuck to its offer of $1 trillion and not a penny more. By Friday, the Senate was going home and the talks had irretrievably stalled.
Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image