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Trump doesn’t want to make America great — he wants America to make him feel great: conservative columnist

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President Donald Trump on Fox News (screengrab)

Writing in The Bulwark this Thursday, conservative columnist Windsor Mann contends that Donald Trump views the presidency as simply a way to stay on TV.

“President Trump craves attention and approval more than anything,” Mann writes. “Being on The Apprentice, Trump told Playboy in 2004, was ‘like being a rock star. Six people do nothing but sort my mail. People come in and want my secretary Robin’s autograph…. People like me much better than they did before The Apprentice.’”

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For Trump, being watched has always meant being liked, according to Mann.

The rallies Trump holds show how much he prefers campaigning for president rather than actually doing the job itself. For Trump, politics are an extension of his ego, and Twitter performs the same function as his rallies.

“Trump cares more about his Twitter account than people’s lives,” Mann writes. “It took him months to respond to the pandemic and a few weeks to be bored by it. Yet, two days after Twitter flagged two of his tweets, Trump signed an executive order targeting social media companies and said he would shut down Twitter if he could.”

“Instead of using Twitter to advance his political agenda, Trump uses the presidency to advance his Twitter agenda.”

Instincts are what Trump uses instead of ideas, and he knows his enemies want to do all they can to remove him from the presidency, which is why he’s fighting so hard to keep a job that he clearly hates. Giving up the presidency would be handing his enemies a gift, and nothing displeases Trump more than pleasing his enemies, writes Mann.

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“He would rather everyone be miserable with him in power than everyone be happy with him out of power.”

Read the full op-ed over at The Bulwark.


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2020 Election

Mental health expert: Trump is waging ‘psychic terrorism against Black Americans

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A prominent Black psychologist is accusing President Trump of waging "psychic terrorism" against Black Americans, and warns that the "psychological trauma" experienced by people of African descent won't simply go away if Trump loses the election.

Dr. Kevin Washington, the former president of the Association of Black Psychologists and the head of the sociology and psychology department at Grambling State University, studies the cultural and historical trauma of people impacted by the legacy of slavery in America. In a recent interviw, he told Salon that the president's rhetoric has effectively given "permission" to act out on "white supremacist" ideology, but was not the primary cause of rising racial tensions across the country.

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2020 Election

There were several glaring omissions in the FBI’s bizarre announcement about election interference

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Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe and FBI Director Christopher Wray announced on Wednesday in a last-minute press briefing that both Iran and Russia have obtained voter registration information and have "taken specific actions to influence public opinion."

In particular, Ratcliffe said that Iran has been found to have sent "spoofed emails designed to intimidate voters, incite social unrest, and damage President Trump." He seemed to be referring to an incident described in a Washington Post story published right before the conference, which said the U.S. has concluded that Iran had sent emails pretending to be from the right-wing group the Proud Boys to Democratic voters.

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Termination of this top Pentagon official reveals another disturbing pattern in the Trump administration

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Warren Whitlock enjoyed a remarkable career as a diversity officer at the federal Transportation Department, winning victories for poor communities of color that his superiors thought impossible. There’s even a documentary film about his success in getting municipal bus service for a Black neighborhood in Beavercreek, Ohio, that had been intentionally bypassed.

In its waning days of the Obama era, the Army chose Whitlock to become one of its highest-ranking Black civilians. His task: resolve diversity issues that had languished for years, some since George Herbert Walker Bush was commander-in-chief nearly three decades ago.

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