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‘We could have done more’: Former Mueller prosecutor speaks out on Russia investigation

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Unlike the Ukraine scandal, former special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation did not result in articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. But it did lead to the prosecutions of some of Trump’s top allies, including his former campaign manager, Paul Manafort. Andrew Weissman, who headed the U.S. Department of Justice’s criminal fraud division, is speaking out about the investigation — which, according to Weissman, went well, but not as well as it could have.

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Mueller’s probe is the subject of Weissman’s new book, “Where Law Ends: Inside the Mueller Investigation,” due out from Random House on September 29.

Weissman told the Associated Press, “I am deeply proud of the work we did and of the unprecedented number of people we indicted and convicted — and in record speed. But the hard truth is that we made mistakes. We could have done more. ‘Where Law Ends’ documents the choices we made, good and bad, for all to see and judge and learn from.”

Weiss, during the AP interview, also said of the book, “This is the story of our investigation into how our democracy was attacked by Russia and how those who condoned and ignored that assault undermined our ability to uncover the truth. My obligation as a prosecutor was to follow the facts where they led, using all available tools and undeterred by the onslaught of the president’s unique powers to undermine our work.”

When Mueller’s report was released in 2019, Trump described it as a total vindication— which is misleading. Mueller asserted that the 2016 Trump campaign’s interactions with Russians, although questionable, did not rise to the level of a full-fledged criminal conspiracy. But Mueller did not render a judgement on obstruction of justice, noting that DOJ policy prohibits the indictment of a sitting president. However, Mueller urged members of Congress to read his report and arrive at their own conclusions.


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2020 Election

Kris Kobach ridiculed after losing comeback bid in Kansas: ‘Adios amigo’

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Former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is the projected loser of the state's Republican primary for the U.S. Senate, the Associated Press reported Tuesday.

Kobach, a longtime crusader against immigration, headed up President Donald Trump's so-called "voter fraud commission" before it was disbanded after failing to identify any widespread instances of fraud.

Kobach unsuccessfully ran for governor in 2018.

Here's some of what people were saying about Kobach's defeat:

https://twitter.com/LokayFOX5/status/1290832478865952768

https://twitter.com/davematt88/status/1290831071462875136

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2020 Election

Maddow reveals the ‘shocking sign’ the White House may be betting Trump is going to lose in 2020

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MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow returned from vacation to host the Tuesday evening edition of her MSNBC show.

Maddow noted, "in 91 days we all get to decide if the guy who's currently in charge of how we're responding to this epidemic should stay in the job for four more years or if Democratic candidate Joe Biden would do better at this."

"It's honestly hard to know what it will be like for a president to stand for re-election with 200,000 dead Americans as a key metric from his first term, while he asks for a second term, but we're going to talk tonight about how some of that is going to work and some of what we can see coming down the pike," she explained. "And a lot of it is very worrying, in terms of the institutions of our democracy and what we count on to keep us a constitutional republic."

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Trump may break with ‘presidential norms’ and give GOP convention speech from the White House lawn: report

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On Tuesday, The Washington Post reported that Republicans are exploring the possibility of President Donald Trump giving his presidential re-nomination speech from the South Lawn of the White House.

"The decision to stage the most high-profile political event of Trump’s reelection campaign at the national seat of presidential power would be just the latest break by Trump in presidential norms, which have historically drawn clear lines between official business of the president and campaign events," reported Michael Scherer and Josh Dawsey. "People involved in the planning said that no final decision had been made on the location of the Republican convention’s celebratory events. Trump abandoned plans to hold the full convention in Charlotte, and later Jacksonville, Fla., over concerns that large crowds could spread the novel coronavirus."

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