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‘Bored’ Falwell blames wife for resignation and says he wasn’t formally accused so he will get $10.5 million: report

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Jerry Falwell, Jr. says he was bored and wanted to quit as president and chancellor of one of the world’s largest conservative Christian colleges. He also says his decision to resign was based in part on him not wanting his wife’s conduct to embarrass Liberty University, the school his “Moral Majority” father founded nearly 50 years ago.

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The Washington Post reports Falwell said “he had not been involved in an affair, but his wife had; Becki Falwell, in the same interview, confirmed that account. Falwell said he was leaving Liberty in part because he did not want his wife’s conduct to embarrass the school. But he also said he had been bored and wanted to move on.”

In the interview with the Post, Falwell also says he will get $10.5 million over the next two years as part of his contract with Liberty. $2.5 million over two years as salary, and another $8 million at the end of that time.

The 58-year old conservative leader says he is entitled to the golden parachute because he was not formally accused of wrongdoing, and did not admit to any, according to the Post.

“The board was gracious not to challenge that,” Falwell said of his decision to step down in good standing.

“There wasn’t any cause,” he said. “I haven’t done anything.”

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But Giancarlo Granda, the Falwell’s “pool boy” and business partner whom they met when he was just 20 years old, tells a vastly different story. He says for seven years he and the couple engaged in an intimate relationship. “Jerry enjoyed watching.”

Granda also released a statement calling Falwell a “predator,” and says Falwell sent him “an image of a female Liberty University student exposing herself at their farm.”

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2020 Election

Republicans’ naked power grab will unwind the legal framework of the majority — and replace it with minority rule

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The big story today is big indeed: how and when the seat on the Supreme Court, now open because of the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday, will be filled. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced within an hour of the announcement of Ginsburg’s passing that he would move to replace her immediately. Trump says he will announce his pick for the seat as early as Tuesday.

Democrats are crying foul. Their immediate complaint is that after Justice Antonin Scalia’s death in February 2016, McConnell refused even to meet with President Barack Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland, on the grounds that it was inappropriate to confirm a Supreme Court justice in an election year. He insisted voters should get to decide on who got to nominate the new justice. This “rule” was invented for the moment: in our history, at least 14 Supreme Court justices have been nominated and confirmed during an election year. (Three more were nominated in December, after an election.)

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Donald Trump may kill off democracy — but Mitch McConnell was the real murderer

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Ever since Donald Trump's oversized suit-clad carcass first befouled the Oval Office, there's been talk in the media about if and when he would cause a constitutional crisis. The assumption underlying this discourse is that a constitutional crisis would hit us like a thunderbolt and we would collectively realize, all at once, that the very fate of our democracy was on the line. Instead, there's been a series of mini-constitutional crises, from Trump stomping all over our laws against foreign emoluments (an old-timey phrase for being bribed by foreign leaders), obstructing justice during Robert Mueller's investigation into Trump's role in Russian election interference, blackmailing the Ukrainian president to extract dishonest election assistance and about a dozen other instances it would be tedious to list.
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‘It affects elderly people … that’s it’: Trump falsely downplays coronavirus to Ohio supporters

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At a rally in Ohio on Monday, President Donald Trump falsely claimed that coronavirus only affects the elderly, and that young people don't die from the illness.

Trump: "We now know the disease... it affects elderly people with heart problems and other problems. That's what it really effects. That's it."

— Andrew Solender (@AndrewSolender) September 22, 2020

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