Quantcast
Connect with us

Virus curfew imposed on Australia’s second-biggest city

Published

on

Australia imposed an overnight curfew on its second-biggest city Sunday and banned people from moving more than five kilometres from home in a bid to control a growing coronavirus outbreak that is infecting hundreds daily.

Declaring a “state of disaster”, Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said Melbourne would move to Stage 4 restrictions until September 13 given “unacceptably high” levels of community transmission.

ADVERTISEMENT

The harshest rules in Australia to date will see city residents face a curfew from 8 pm to 5 am for the next six weeks. Only those carrying out essential work, or seeking or providing care, will be allowed out.

“The time for leniency, the time for warnings and cautions is over,” Andrews said.

“If you are not at home and you should be, if you have the virus and are just going about your business, you will be dealt with harshly. Lives are at stake.”

Melbourne residents will be limited to an hour of exercise a day, no further than five kilometres (about three miles) from home starting Sunday night.

Only one person per household will be able to shop for essential items each day, also within the same strict radius.

ADVERTISEMENT

Most school and university students in Melbourne will go back to online learning from midnight Wednesday, just weeks after returning to their classrooms, while weddings will also be banned.

The sweeping new measures follow a city-wide lockdown that began in early July but has failed to curb the spread of the virus, with Andrews blaming the continuing rise in cases on people flouting stay-at-home orders.

– ‘Months, and months and months’ –

ADVERTISEMENT

“These are the decisions made because anything short of this will not keep us safe,” Andrews said, adding anything less “will see it drag on for months and months and months”.

Additional restrictions affecting workplaces would be announced Monday, Andrews added, suggesting that non-essential businesses will face closures.

ADVERTISEMENT

Victoria accounts for the vast majority of active coronavirus cases in Australia, recording 671 new cases and seven deaths from the virus Sunday.

Health authorities have linked the resurgence to security bungles at hotels used to quarantine international travellers that allowed the virus to leak back into the community.

The state’s chief health officer, Brett Sutton, said an estimated 20,000 cases were averted during Stage 3 restrictions, but flattening the curve to hundreds of new cases a day was “intolerable”.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We need to see those numbers through the eyes of our healthcare workers and the kind of awful fear that they have about what it means for people presenting to hospital,” he said.

The virus has spread rapidly among vulnerable residents in aged-care centres, where government disaster relief teams have been deployed to replace infected staff.

Outside Melbourne, the rest of Victoria will move to a Stage 3 lockdown from midnight Wednesday with people allowed to leave home only for essential work, study, care and needed supplies.

Elsewhere in Australia, other states and territories have for weeks reported few or no new cases while relaxing restrictions.

ADVERTISEMENT

They have, however, banned visitors from Victoria and Sydney — another virus hotspot.

New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian said people were now being “strongly encouraged” to wear masks, particularly on public transport, in shops and at places of worship as the state attempts to avoid the fate of neighbouring Victoria.

“We are holding the line and doing OK but I cannot stress enough that the next few weeks will make or break us, in terms of the way we get through this pandemic,” she told reporters in Sydney.

Berejiklian added that unlike in Victoria, masks were not compulsory but would instead act as a “fourth line of defence” after testing, social distancing and hand-washing.

ADVERTISEMENT

Australia’s total reported infections reached almost 18,000 on Sunday, with 208 deaths in a population of 25 million.

Australian authorities have slapped an overnight curfew on Melbourne and barred residents from moving more than five kilometres from home

A group of police and soldiers patrol the Docklands area of Melbourne after the announcement of new restrictions to curb the spread of the coronavirus


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump: ‘I’m doing the country a big favor’ with my conspiracy theories about voter fraud

Published

on

At Wednesday's White House briefing on coronavirus, President Donald Trump was once again asked about his conspiracy theories about mail-in ballot fraud, in light of his move to sue the state of Nevada to stop an expansion of the practice.

When confronted with his previous lie that Nevada isn't checking signatures, Trump doubled down, saying it would be "physically impossible" to verify the ballots. He then repeated, for the third day in a row, his complaints about the New York primary process — and when a reporter pointed out to him that the delays in ballot reporting isn't evidence of fraud, he replied, "well, you're reading a different newspaper than me."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Facebook removes first Trump post as a lie

Published

on

Facebook has been criticized by users for refusing to check President Donald Trump's false information, incorrect ads, and array of posts on the social media site, but it wasn't until Wednesday that they finally removed a post for his lying.

"This video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19 which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation," Andy Stone, a Facebook policy spokesperson told NBC News.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

CIA ignores request to brief GOP senators trying to dig up dirt on Joe Biden’s son: report

Published

on

On Wednesday, Politico reported that the Central Intelligence Agency is ignoring a request to brief the Republican senators mounting an investigation into Hunter Biden's business dealings in Ukraine.

"The spy agency’s resistance comes amid intelligence officials’ deep skepticism of the probe, which is being led by Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) and focuses on Hunter Biden’s role on the board of the Ukrainian energy company Burisma," reported Andrew Desiderio and Natasha Bertrand. "Democrats argue the investigation is based on Russian disinformation aimed at tipping the outcome of the election toward President Donald Trump — a charge that Johnson rejects."

Continue Reading
 
 

Virus curfew imposed on Australia’s second-biggest city

Melbourne (AFP) – Australia on Sunday introduced sweeping new measures to control a growing coronavirus outbreak in its second-biggest city, including an overnight curfew and a ban on weddings for the first time during the pandemic.Despite a lockdown that began in early July, Melbourne has continued to report hundreds of new cases daily, and authorities said the city’s residents would now face a curfew from 8 pm to 5 am for the next six weeks.Declaring a “state of disaster” on Sunday, Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said the state capital would move to Stage 4 restrictions until September 13 g… (more…)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Herbivores face higher extinction risk than predators: study

Published

on

Herbivores face a higher risk of extinction than predators, whether they are mammals, birds or reptiles, according to an extensive study of 24,500 species both living and extinct that was published Wednesday.

The paper, which appeared in Science Advances, suggests herbivores have suffered a higher extinction rate over the past 50,000 years compared to other parts of the food web and the trend continues to this day.

This contradicts the idea, based on anecdotal evidence, that predators are the most vulnerable because they have extensive home ranges and slow population growth rates.

Continue Reading

COVID-19

A third of Afghans estimated to have contracted virus: health ministry

Published

on

Nearly a third of Afghanistan's population -- or 10 million people -- has been infected with the coronavirus, according to health ministry estimates published Wednesday.

The figure comes from a survey based on antibody tests on around 9,500 people across the country, with technical support from the World Health Organization, health minister Ahmad Jawad Osmani said at a press briefing.

The survey estimated that 31.5 percent of the population had contracted the virus, with the highest infection rate in Kabul where more than half of the city's five million population were thought to have been infected.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

German neo-Nazi on trial over politician murder admits to killing

Published

on

A German neo-Nazi on trial over the murder of pro-refugee politician Walter Luebcke admitted Wednesday to the killing that has shocked the nation and highlighted the growing threat of right-wing extremism.

"I fired the shot," Stephan Ernst, 46, told the court of the killing in a statement read out by his defense.

Federal prosecutors have said Ernst was motivated by "racism and xenophobia" when he allegedly shot Luebcke in the head on June 1, 2019.

Luebcke's killing is believed to be Germany's first far-right political assassination since World War II.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image