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Governors balk at Trump’s executive order forcing them to pick up slack for pandemic stimulus

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President Donald Trump (screengrab)

On Monday, The New York Times reported that multiple governors are upset about President Donald Trump’s plan to extend unemployment benefits by executive order, saying that the plan forces them to come up with too much money for their budgets to afford.

“Congress initially provided a $600-a-week supplement to unemployment benefits when the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the United States in March,” said the report. “But that benefit lapsed on July 31, after talks between the White House and Congress broke down. Republicans had pushed for a $400 supplemental benefit, Democrats said it was not enough, and so on Saturday Mr. Trump ordered the $400 benefit — but said it was contingent on states to come up with $100 of that on their own.”

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One governor criticizing this proposal is Andrew Cuomo (D-NY), who said, “This only makes a bad situation worse. When you are in a hole, stop digging. This executive order only digs the hole deeper.” Gov. Andy Beshear (D-KY) agreed, saying his state can’t produce the required $1.5 billion, and adding, “It’s not workable in its current form. It’s something virtually no state can afford.”

The unemployment insurance extension is one of four executive orders and memoranda signed by Trump over the weekend, as his party is unable to make a deal to extend stimulus with congressional Democrats. Other directives seek to defer evictions in federally-backed housing and payments on federally-backed student loans, and one other delays payroll taxes. The president anticipates these policies will face a challenge in court.


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2020 Election

Trump’s attempt to checkmate Biden on his son’s sobriety made him look woefully out of touch: columnist

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During the Tuesday debate, President Donald Trump attacked Vice President Joe Biden's son Hunter for being a recovering drug addict. A profound column by The Atlantic's Adam Serwer explained that not only was it cruel, but it makes Trump woefully out of touch with Americans and says more about his relationship with his children than anything.

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White man insists he’s not racist after shooting up Black family’s home

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A Michigan man is facing nine criminal counts in the wake of a violent campaign of intimidation against a Black family who are his neighbors, but he insists he's not racist and wants the family to forgive him, the Detroit Free Press reports.

Michael John Frederick, Jr., who is white, is accused of firing multiple gunshots into the home and vehicle of the family, writing graffiti on their vehicle and slashing tires.

“I am extremely regretful of what I did,” he said of his attacks against Eddie and Candace Hall. “I can say it’s not like me. I acted way out of character. This wasn’t about the color of anyone’s skin.”

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Watching Fox News can be deadly — according to science

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Consuming the wrong news can kill you. That’s the fundamental insight of a powerful new study about the impact of watching either Sean Hannity’s news show Hannity or Tucker Carlson’s Tucker Carlson Tonight on Fox News: one saved lives, and the other resulted in more deaths, due to how each of these hosts covered COVID-19.

This research illustrates the danger of falling for health-related misinformation due to dangerous judgment errors known as cognitive biases. These mental blindspots impact all areas of our life, from health to politics and even shopping, as a survey by a comparison purchasing website reveals. We need to be wary of cognitive biases in order to make wise decisions about our health and our politics to survive and thrive in this pandemic.

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