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Prosecutors ask for Depardieu rape case to be reopened

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French actor Gerard Depardieu was given Russian citizenship in 2013 by President Vladimir Putin after publicly criticising France's high taxes and taking up residence abroad (AFP Photo/Valery Hache)

Paris prosecutors said Saturday they had asked for an investigation into rape allegations against French actor Gerard Depardieu to be reopened after an earlier probe was dropped last year.

An actress in her 20s accuses Depardieu of assaulting and raping her in his Paris home in August 2018.

After she reported her allegations against the celebrated actor — who is 71 and who denies any wrongdoing — prosecutors in the southern city of Aix-en-Provence opened a preliminary investigation which they then passed on to their Paris colleagues.

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The Paris probe was dropped after nine months in early 2019 after investigators failed to assemble enough proof to proceed to formal charges.

But now the actress has relaunched proceedings by acting as an “injured party” which under French law almost always leads to a case being examined by an investigating magistrate.

Depardieu’s lawer, Herve Temime, declined to comment when contacted by AFP.

Depardieu, who is a superstar in France thanks to films like “Cyrano de Bergerac”, “Jean de Florette” and “Camille Claudel”, has also had a successful international career, working among others with Peter Weir in “Green Card” and with Ridley Scott in “1492”.

He holds French and Russian citizenship.

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Trump and Bill Barr’s ‘bloodthirsty execution spree’ in his final months in office is unprecedented: op-ed

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In an op-ed for Slate this Tuesday, Austin Sarat says that the Trump administration's announcement that it would continue to carry out executions in the days and weeks leading up to the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden is a "bloodthirsty decision" that defies "the norms and conventions for modern presidential transitions."

"The Death Penalty Information Center reports that the last time an outgoing administration did anything remotely similar was more than a century ago, in 1889," Sarat writes. "At that time Grover Cleveland, the first Democrat to be elected president after the Civil War and the only president ever to have served as an executioner (when he was the sheriff in Erie County, New York), permitted three executions to proceed in the period between his electoral defeat and Benjamin Harrison’s inauguration in March 1889."

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‘I’m in tears’: Americans grateful after watching Biden deliver more presidential speech than Trump

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President-elect Joe Biden addressed the nation about the Thanksgiving holiday, encouraging Americans to keep wearing their masks and stay away from people outside of your bubble because there is a light at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel of terror.

There are reports of vaccines possibly being available to healthcare and nursing home workers by the end of the year, which could help with over-crowding in hospitals.

Biden spoke about his family's large Thanksgivings and how hard it will be for him this holiday season without the crowd of Bidens. But he, like many Americans, are doing the right thing, he said, not just for his family but for every other family in the community.

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A critical mass of civil servants, elected officials and judges rebuffed Trump’s attempts to overturn the election: op-ed

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Writing in the New York Times this Wednesday, columnist Thomas Friedman says that after President Trump spent the last three weeks refusing to acknowledge that he’d lost the election, Americans should be especially thankful this Thanksgiving that we had a "critical mass" of civil servants, elected officials and judges who did their jobs.

"It was their collective integrity, their willingness to stand with 'Team America,' not either party, that protected our democracy when it was facing one of its greatest threats — from within. History will remember them fondly," Friedman writes.

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