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Republican scheme to fear-monger about America’s cities has a fatal flaw — it’s ridiculous

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The White House as portrayed in the 2013 film "Olympus Has Fallen" (screengrab).

Conservatives are attempting to scare voters into voting to re-elect Donald Trump by painting a dystopian view of America’s cities.

While critics have noted the absurdity of such a claim, as Trump is the current president, another flaw was repeatedly pointed out on Twitter on Saturday.

“There’s this creepy vibe in DC right now where it’s obvious how badly the city’s been destroyed by rioters, and yet people are almost afraid to point it out or oppose it. You almost have to whistle past the boarded up windows as if it’s all just normal,” former Washington Examiner writer Robert Wargas argued on Twitter.

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The problem is that claim does not jibe with the lived experiences of those in DC. As the claim happened to be about the nation’s capital, multiple members the DC press corps soon debunked — or mocked — Wargas for his claim.

“I honestly can’t imagine just lying to people like this,” HuffPost reporter Kevin Robillard posted on Twitter.

“Lol this guy is so full of shit,” BuzzFeed News reporter Paul McLeod posted. “I live in a very central area of DC and this guy is so ludicrously wrong I can only assume the tweet is meant for the people in suburbs/rural areas watching YouTube propaganda about how the nation’s cities are all war zones.”

“That’s not to say DC isn’t dystopian. You should see the lineups to get into beer gardens these days,” he added.

Other people posted pictures to make their point.

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Others just mocked Wargas:

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https://twitter.com/ZaknafeinDC/status/1299856124095672321

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