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Election officials bracing for ‘constitutional crisis’ as Trump threatens to reject vote results: report

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Donald Trump (Screen Grab)

On Thursday, The Washington Post reported that as President Donald Trump escalates his preemptive threats to challenge or defy the result of the election if he loses, law enforcement and election officials are bracing for a constitutional crisis.

“Trump’s running commentary about an illegitimate vote reverberated from coast to coast,” reported Philip Rucker, Amy Gardner, and Annie Linskey. “Many of Trump’s Republican allies in Congress, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), issued perfunctory statements declaring that the winner of the Nov. 3 election would be inaugurated on Jan. 20 — an orderly transition as there traditionally has been in the United States. Democratic state attorneys general strategized among themselves on what to do if the president refuses to accept the result and said they were most concerned that his drumbeat of unfounded accusations about fraud could undermine public confidence in the election.”

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Trump has suggested that he will try to get mail-in ballots — which are expected to skew more Democratic than usual this year due to the president’s partisan messaging — thrown out. He has also suggested that his urgency in filling the Supreme Court vacancy stems from his desire to ensure the judiciary will take his side.

“Categorically and emphatically, when you have public officials casting doubt on the process, it’s incredibly corrosive,” said Democratic Maine Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap. “It’s nearly a criminal or treasonous act. We hold a sacred trust, and it is our job to make people feel like they’re protected in their decision-making, as the authors of our future.”

Meanwhile, some secretaries of state are exploring how to prevent Trump-inspired voter intimidation, like Katie Hobbs in Arizona. “One of the conversations we are having is what that response should look like,” she said. “A uniformed officer with a weapon can look intimidating, and we want to be very careful about that.”


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2020 Election

Trump says militia that sought to kidnap and kill Michigan’s Gov. Whitmer was ‘maybe a problem, maybe it wasn’t’

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In a startling moment during his Michigan rally Tuesday, President Donald Trump implied that the militia that attempted to kidnap and kill Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D-MI) was maybe or maybe not all that big of a problem.

“People are entitled to say maybe it was a problem, maybe it wasn’t," Trump told his rally.

It's a commonly used tactic by Trump to say things like "people say" or "some say" or raise hypotheticals so that it gives him the ability to say "I don't think that, people do." But he has never been able to cite the actual person that said that to him.

In this case, one would assume all political leaders would oppose kidnapping and killing a political leader regardless of the party to which he or she belongs. In Ohio they've opted for a gentler approach, merely trying to recall Republican Gov. Mike DeWine for his mask mandate.

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2020 Election

‘No wonder he’s losing suburban women’: Trump flattened for promise he’s putting ‘your husbands back to work’

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President Donald Trump is drawing ire from women as his closing message to female voters is, "We’re getting your husbands back to work!"

Trump made the statement to a cheering crowd in Michigan Tuesday, though he didn't clarify what women should do if they work outside of the home and have been laid off due to the pandemic. It also appears the president has decided to ignore unmarried women entirely.

See the

https://twitter.com/Carmen50/status/1321180829259710464

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2020 Election

Trump’s closing argument to women: ‘We’re getting your husbands back to work’

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One week before the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump made his closing argument to women at a campaign rally in Lansing, Michigan.

"I love women and I can't help it, they're the greatest," Trump said, four years after the Access Hollywood tape was released which showed him bragging about sexually assaulting strangers.

"I love them much more than the men," he added.

Trump also made an economic argument that sounded as dated as his talk about "suburban housewives."

"We're getting your husbands -- they want to get back to work, right? We're getting your husbands back to work," he argued.

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