Gen. James Mattis quit the White House when he was told to commit a felony: report
White House photo of President Donald Trump and former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis at the Army-Navy football game.

Bob Woodward's new book Rage is filled with horrifying tales and brutal honesty about President Donald Trump's recklessness in leading the nation.


One of the previously reported revelations about Trump's attacks on military generals, who Trump called "p*ssies," goes far deeper than simply insults.

In excerpts published by New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman, Trump told Gen. James Mattis to commit a felony.

"When Mr. Mattis quit after Mr. Trump wanted to withdraw troops fighting the Islamic State in the Middle East," Haberman described Woodward's text.

"When I was basically directed to do something that I thought went beyond stupid to felony stupid, strategically jeopardizing our place in the world and everything else, that's when I quit," said Mattis.

In another incident, Trump said of South Korea that the United States is the only reason they're all still alive.

"We're defending you, we're allowing you to exist," Trump said of South Korea.

The excerpts also cited Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner for being gleeful that Democrats defended the people of Baltimore, Maryland, after Trump insulted it as a "disgusting, rat and rodent-infested mess." Kushner, who has never worked in politics, thought it would be a great campaign strategy for the Republicans.

"The Democrats are so crazy, they're basically defending Baltimore," said Kushner. "When you get to the next election, he's tied them to all these stupid positions because they'd rather attack him than actually be rational."

Kushner appeared to be ignorant that many thought Trump was calling the people "rodents" and saying that the city was rat-infested.

Cummings passed away just three months after Trump's insults, and Baltimore hasn't been a campaign issue for any Republican running for national office as of yet.

Read the full story at the New York Times.