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Mike Pence scrubs QAnon fundraiser at the last moment

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Only 48 hours before Vice President Mike Pence was scheduled to travel to Montana for a fundraiser, the event has been called off.

“Vice President Mike Pence has canceled plans to attend a Trump campaign fundraiser in Montana following revelations that the event’s hosts had expressed support for the QAnon conspiracy theory,” the Associated Press reported Saturday.

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“President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign told The Associated Press on Saturday that Pence’s schedule had been changed, but the campaign did not provide a reason or say whether the fundraiser might be held at a later time. The change comes after the AP reported Wednesday that hosts Cayrn and Michael Borland in Bozeman, Montana, had shared QAnon memes and retweeted posts from QAnon accounts,” the AP reported. “The baseless conspiracy theory alleges Trump is battling an entrenched bureaucracy and sex trafficking ring run by pedophiles.”

The top of the Republican Party ticket in Montana had been scheduled to attend. Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT), who is being challenged by Gov. Steve Bullock (D-MT), was billed as planning to attend. As was Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-MT), who is the GOP nominee for governor, and state Auditor Matt Rosendale, who is the nominee for Montana’s lone congressional seat.

“Daines campaign spokesperson Julia Doyle said the first-term senator does not know the Borlands nor ‘does he know what QAnon even is.’ She referred questions on whether the event would be rescheduled to the Trump campaign,” the AP reported. “The Borlands have donated over $220,000 to Trump’s reelection bid, the bulk of which was made in Caryn Borland’s name, and they were guests at the national GOP convention last month.”

“The QAnon narrative has grown to include other long-standing conspiracy theories, gaining traction among some extreme Trump supporters. The movement is often likened to a right-wing cult. Some followers have run for office, primarily in the Republican Party, though some have been independent or run as third-party candidates. Trump has refused to say QAnon is false,” the AP noted.

Read the full report.

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Trump supporter arrested for child abuse after striking 12-year-old girl with a flagpole: report

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A Florida man was arrested this week after he was caught on video assaulting a 12-year-old girl with a flag pole, the Florida Times-Union reports.

Norbert Eugene Logsdon Jr. was charged Wednesday with abuse of a child without great bodily harm. He was subsequently released in bail.

The incident was captured on video by the child's mother and was posted to Facebook. She and her daughter were driving past a sidewalk pro-Trump demonstration when the mother yelled something antagonistic to the Trump supporters. That's when Logsdon shoved the flagpole through the open right-front passenger window.

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Medical expert doubts Trump’s claim every American will have a COVID vaccine by April: ‘I don’t see how that’s possible’

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Speaking on CNN this Friday, professor of tropical medicine, Dr. Peter Hotez, pushed back on President Trump's claim that every American will have access to a coronavirus vaccine by April.

According to Hotez, there's "just too many unknowns right now" for Trump or any other administration official "to make such a statement.

Even if the vaccines currently in development work, "we don't have the details on the distribution," he added.

"There's going to be a lot of unknown questions," he continued. "We have to really take it in stages."

Watch the video below:

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Shocking emails document Trump administration’s scheme to muzzle the CDC — and misinform Americans

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Emails obtained by The New York Times detail how Trump administration political appointees sought to silence the Centers for Disease Control during the coronavirus pandemic.

"On June 30, as the coronavirus was cresting toward its summer peak, Dr. Paul Alexander, a new science adviser at the Department of Health and Human Services, composed a scathing two-page critique of an interview given by a revered scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention," the newspaper reported. "Dr. Anne Schuchat, a 32-year veteran of the C.D.C. and its principal deputy director, had appealed to Americans to wear masks and warned, 'We have way too much virus across the country.' But Dr. Alexander, a part-time assistant professor of health research methods, appeared sure he understood the coronavirus better."

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