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US government study highlights COVID-19 risk from bars and restaurants

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The US economy is starting to reopen, but many firms will need help to stay afloat SAUL LOEB AFP/File

A new study by US health authorities published Thursday provided more data showing that, when it comes to catching Covid-19, visiting bars and restaurants is far more dangerous than going shopping, working from an office or using public transport.

It was already suspected that this was the case, but few studies have sought to rigorously establish a hierarchy of risk in public activities.

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The new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) isn’t perfect: it can’t confirm definitively where people in the cases it studied were infected.

CDC officials approached people who had gone for a test at 11 American hospitals in July and asked them to fill out a detailed questionnaire.

Overall, about 300 participated, half of whom tested positive and the other half negative.

Participants were asked questions about possible community exposure over the previous 14 days, in settings including public transport, at private gatherings, offices, churches, salons, bars and restaurants.

They realized that the participants who tested positive and those who tested negative reported similar mask-wearing behavior and similar levels of exposure in all the settings except bars and restaurants.

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“Adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than were those with negative SARS-CoV-2 test results,” it found.

The risk was even higher for bars when the analysis was restricted to participants who hadn’t reported exposure to a person with a known case of Covid-19.

The analysis will need further validation, particularly since it did not distinguish between indoor and outdoor drinking and dining settings.

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But it is further evidence of the contamination risks associated with microdroplets that travel much further than the six feet (two meters) recommended by social distancing guidelines and can be carried along air ventilation currents.

Eating and drinking also requires people to take off their masks, which they do not need to do in other settings.

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MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle: The markets finally realized the economic crisis is linked to the health crisis

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MSNBC market expert Stephanie Ruhle told Brian Williams on Wednesday that the reason Americans saw the stock market fall this week is that they have finally realized that things aren't getting any better.

Williams asked if the numbers this week are different from normal pre-election years.

"This is quite different," said Ruhle. "The markets have woken up to the fact that this health crisis is directly linked to the economic crisis. The markets can't thrive when we don't have a national plan to deal with the coronavirus. And you look at the GDP, you know that tomorrow, you led the show with it, the president is going to say, 'We're back, baby! With the greatest economy ever.' That's not the case. We have been seeing improvements. We are on the road to recovery. But even if we get 30 percent, 35 percent GDP, which would be positive, it's far from saying we're back."

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2020 Election

Brett Kavanaugh revised his Wisconsin ruling after Vermont official’s demands — but it still contains the lies

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Supreme Court Justice revised his Wisconsin opinion after a Vermont official complained that he misrepresented the way the state dealt with the election amid the pandemic. The problem, however, is that his corrections only cleaned up the sloppy language.

While it no longer appears like a high school mock trial assignment, it still lies about the example he gave in the Vermont details.

https://twitter.com/Jordan_S_Rubin/status/1321628261714190336

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2020 Election

Trump’s new favorite X-ray doctor is retweeting demands Dr. Fauci debate him

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President Donald J. Trump selected radiologist Scott William Atlas as his newest health care policy advisor on the White House Coronavirus Task Force this past August after a public fallout with immunologist Dr. Anthony Fauci. The two scholars could not be any more different on their approach to mitigating the pandemic, which has so far killed over 227,000 Americans.

"If we get a vaccination campaign, and by the second or third quarter of 2021 we have vaccinated a substantial proportion of the people, I think it will be easily by the end of 2021, and perhaps even into the next year, before we start having some semblances of normality," Fauci said recently during a University of Melbourne panel.

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