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Early returns in Florida show the electorate is skewing younger than in 2016

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Lockdowns are easing. The jobs plight for young people not so much. / © AFP

The preliminary returns in Florida show that the electorate is skewing much younger than four years ago when President Donald Trump ran against former Sec. Hillary Clinton.

“In ballots returned before in-person voting opened on Monday, Florida voters under 65 years old accounted for about half the ballots cast, marking a 12-point uptick in their share of the early vote compared to this time in 2016,” CNN.com reported.

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Previously, the share of the Florida electorate that is over 65 was as much as 64 percent. Now, they’re just 52 percent. Older voters should be the ones voting by mail and voting early given the dangers of the coronavirus pandemic. But it appears that younger people are the ones turning out instead.

“This boost in early turnout among younger voters may reflect nationwide organizing efforts to mobilize young people to vote early, while seniors in the state may already be accustomed to voting early in previous cycles,” said CNN.

In fact, the March for Our Lives movement, which started in Parkland, Florida after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School inspired young voters to turn out and support candidates who will make school safety a priority while in office.

Despite the support among older voters in previous years, Republicans are experiencing a significant decrease.

“In 2016, Trump won about 57 percent of their vote, according to exit polls, which helped boost his one-percentage point victory in the state,” said CNN. That lead has been eliminated this time around as the COVID-19 pandemic has become a top issue for seniors.

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Read the full report at CNN.com


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2020 Election

Anthony Scaramucci: ‘Trump is really losing it psychologically’

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Former White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci on Tuesday suggested that President Donald Trump is suffering mental problems after losing the 2020 election.

"Trump is really losing it, psychologically," Scaramucci wrote on Twitter. "His followers don’t get that being a 'loser' is just about as bad as actual death to him."

"He is now a 'loser' in his daddy’s eyes," he added. "All he can do is act out. I wonder how it will end."

Trump is really losing it, psychologically. His followers don’t get that being a “loser” is just about as bad as actual death to him. He is now a “loser” in his daddy’s eyes. All he can do is act out. I wonder how it will end.

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2020 Election

Rick Wilson and George Conway hilariously ridicule the GOP’s attempt to save Georgia’s Senate seats as Trump implodes

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Conservative attorney George Conway -- who is married to former Donald Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway -- made an appearance on GOP consultant Rick Wilson's "The New Abnormal" podcast on Tuesday, where the two Lincoln Project founders wondered whether the president really wants the Republican Party to hang onto the two Georgia Senate seats headed for a run-off in January after he went down to defeat in the state.

The trio started off the Daily Beast podcast with a hilarious dramatic reading of the Washington Post's bombshell report about the president's inability to comprehend how he lost the election, with Conway laughing at the mention of Trump's "fragile mental state."

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‘Checkmate’: Legal experts agree remaining Trump election challenges won’t ‘amount to anything’

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President Donald Trump has exhausted nearly all of his options for overturning his election loss to Joe Biden, legal experts agree.

Trump continues flinging lies about voter fraud from his Twitter account, and only a few highly improbable options remain before Biden is inaugurated next month, reported Bloomberg.

“It’s checkmate in terms of the various chess moves on the board, but they could try go for other moves anyway,” said Edward Foley, director of an election-law program at Ohio State University. “Normally when you see that it’s going to be checkmate, you sort of concede.”

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