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Is it wrong to wish ill on Trump even though he’s killed so many with his negligence?

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Assistant professor of philosophy Sasha Mudd wrote an op-ed in The New York Times Oct. 10 that presented, “The other day, my 7-year-old, having gotten wind of President Trump’s Covid-19 diagnosis, asked me point blank, ‘Mommy, are you glad that Trump got the coronavirus?'”

“Here’s how I explained the moral quandary to my 7-year-old: I am sad that Mr. Trump got sick because in general suffering is bad, and I don’t want anyone to suffer, but on the other hand I think he should suffer consequences for the harm he has done,” Mudd wrote. “This answer seemed satisfying enough at the time, but it left out an important distinction. What I did not try to explain is that the punishment that Mr. Trump’s bout of Covid-19 represents is merely symbolic, a stand-in for the real punishment he deserves, which is necessarily social in character. Mr. Trump deserves to be punished at the ballot box and to be held accountable for any possible criminal wrongdoing in a court of law.”

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The reader responses ranged in everything from, “I must admit that the irony that he may well lose the election because he refused to take Covid-19 seriously gives pleasure to some of us,” to “I have worked with many people who police their thoughts and are severely inhibited by the repression it requires.”

Many of us have wished the Russian-compromised illegitimate president with the slimy anti-everything rhetoric that has embedded it’s evil and hatred into our society – and democracy – ill. As Donald J. Trump continues to slide his gaslighting antics on his White supremacist followers for the nth time, America is beginning to wake up to a new dawn. Still, does thinking bad thoughts about the president cause you to be a horrible human being? And is it even worth admitting these thoughts to others?

“I think Sasha Mudd overlooks a basic point,” wrote William James Earle. “Wishing harm, feeling glee at another’s suffering and even hoping that someone will die are all causally inert. They don’t in themselves hurt anyone. What morality strictly forbids is taking the smallest step, the least action, to hurt another, cause suffering or bring about death. We have to worry about what we do, not what we feel.”


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2020 Election

US lawmakers renew stimulus push as focus shifts to Biden

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President-elect Joe Biden will present his economic team on Tuesday, as a bipartisan group of senators make a renewed push for another stimulus package to help the faltering US economy.

With Covid-19 cases spiking, the world's largest economy faces an uncertain outlook that Biden and his economic team led by nominee for Treasury secretary Janet Yellen will have to work to remedy.The diverse group, with women and minorities in key roles, will face millions in jobs losses and a rising wave of small businesses shutting their doors and major corporations laying off their workers.

Outgoing Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin agrees on the need for more federal help for workers left jobless and business battered by the pandemic.

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2020 Election

‘Conjecture and musings’: Dem senator tears into Trump ‘election fraud’ witness at Michigan hearing

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Michigan state Sen. Jeff Irwin (D) blasted former state Sen. Patrick Colbeck (R) at an election fraud hearing on Tuesday.

At a state Senate Oversight Committee hearing, Colbeck suggested that there was a plot to use voting machines to steal the election from President Donald Trump.

For his part, Irwin noted that Trump had not requested a recount in Michigan.

"If you were on the losing end, much like, say, President Trump or candidate John James, would you have requested a recount?" the Democratic lawmaker asked.

"I've doubts with the integrity of the recount process," Colbeck replied. "So, I probably would not have done that."

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2020 Election

Dem senator shames Steve Mnuchin to his face: ‘You’re leaving the country worse than you found it’

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Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) on Tuesday shamed Trump Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin for his decision to not extend the Federal Reserve's emergency lending facilities that were designed to keep the economy afloat during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Brown started off by giving Mnuchin a blunt assessment of the state of the economy that he will be handing off to his successor.

"Last week, 778,000 people filed for unemployment insurance," he said. "In October, 3.4 million homeowners were past due when their mortgages, many of them will run out of forbearance options by April. As many as 40 million renters will spend the holidays worrying that they will be evicted on January 1st if their government, if we don't do our job."

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