Quantcast
Connect with us

Peru unveils giant cat etching at famous Nazca site

Published

on

This photo released by the Peruvian Ministry of Culture and taken on October 15, 2020 shows a giant cat figure etched into a slope at the Unesco world heritage site in the desert near the town of Nasca in southern Peru - Peruvian Ministry of Culture/AFP

A giant 2,000-year-old figure of a feline that was on the brink of disappearing will be the new cat’s meow when Peru’s remarkable Nazca Lines attraction reopens to tourists in November.

The geoglyph is around 120 feet (37 meters) long and was recently discovered by a drone on a hillside, the culture ministry said.

“The figure was barely visible and was about to disappear due to the effects of natural erosion as it’s on a fairly steep slope,” said the ministry.

ADVERTISEMENT

A group of archeologists took on the job of cleaning and preserving the geoglyph, which shows a cat with its body in profile but its head front on.

The lines making up its outline were mostly well defined and 12-15 inches (30-40 centimeters) wide.

Experts say its stylistic features mean it is from the late Paracas period, more than 2,000 years ago and older than the other famous Nazca figures such as the mockingbird, monkey, and spider.

The people that formed the Nazca civilization in that area of southwestern Peru lived there from 200 to 700 AD, but the cat dates from 200-100 BC.

The Paracas culture lived in the area from 800-100 BC and is believed to have been responsible for the Palpa Lines, which are similar to but less famous than the nearby Nazca ones.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Nazca Lines, most of which are only visible from the sky, were made by people making incisions on the desert floor to leave different colored dirt exposed.

They are made up of thousands of lines including geometric patterns as well as the more famous animal figures.

The reason for their creation is unknown but soe theories include astrological and religious significance, as well as indicators of water sources.

ADVERTISEMENT

The area, some 220 miles (350 kilometers) south of Peru’s capital Lima, is a Unesco World Heritage site.

© 2020 AFP


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Georgia Republicans slammed for only caring about Trump’s voter fraud lies when it threatens to harm them

Published

on

Republicans are growing increasingly worried that conspiracy theories about mass election fraud may depress voter turnout and could cost them in the upcoming Georgia runoffs, and according to the Washington Post's Greg Sargent, there's a "vile aspect" to this development that's no laughing matter.

"Georgia Republicans don’t mind when Trump lies about the integrity of their elections in a way that they think will help them," he writes. "They only mind when Trump lies about the integrity of their elections in a way that threatens to harm them."

Continue Reading

Guns

Donald Trump Jr. wants to become head of the NRA – and fire Wayne LaPierre

Published

on

Now that his father won't be president much longer, Donald Trump, Jr. is looking for a means to expand his base. There have been rumors he would seek a presidential run in 2024, if his father does not.

But Trump, Jr. now has his eyes on someone else's job: NRA executive vice president Wayne LaPierre's.

The National Rifle Association is in deep distress. The New York Attorney General is trying to completely shut it down. There are reports of massive accounting and cash irregularities, including lavish lifestyle payments for its top brass. There are also the reports of its alleged ties to Russia and the $30 million it spent in 2016 to help put Donald Trump in the White House.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

More Republican Senators seem open to another huge stimulus — despite McConnell’s resistance

Published

on

While COVID-19 vaccines are on their way, the impact of the pandemic has worsened in the United States due to large gatherings, holiday travel and the ongoing resistance of some to wear a mask. Eviction rates are climbing, contributing to more COVID cases, bankruptcies are up too, and small businesses are struggling to stay afloat or closing their doors forever.

Continue Reading