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Suicides never actually went up under COVID-19 as Trump suggested: report

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President Donald Trump at a campaign rally in Erie, Pennsylvania (screengrab).

President Donald Trump has spent the better part of the past several months justifying the reopening despite the COVID-19 pandemic by saying that people are dying whether it was from the coronavirus or something else.

“I mean, we have never closed the country before, and we have had some pretty bad flus, and we have had some pretty bad viruses” Trump said at a Fox News town hall in March. “You’re going to have suicides by the thousands.”

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“People get tremendous anxiety and depression, and you have suicides over things like this when you have terrible economies. You have death,” he said at a press briefing that same month. “Probably and — I mean, definitely — would be in far greater numbers than the numbers that we’re talking about with regard to the virus.”

But according to public health data, there’s nothing that substantiates Trump’s claim.

Emergency room physician Jeremy Samuel Faust wrote for the Washington Post explained that there are legitimate questions about the pandemic’s toll on mental health but making up anecdotal information to justify rebuilding Trump’s economy isn’t helping anyone.

“Some of the impact may have more to do with the continuing inability to control the virus, and with the ensuing economic fallout, than with Americans’ staying home for weeks and even months in the spring,” he wrote. “That said, a rise in suicides or other suffering resulting from temporary stay-home advisories is neither guaranteed nor inevitable. To get this right, both now and in the future, we have to keep asking the right questions and awaiting the actual answers — and remember that the questions themselves, no matter how obvious their implications might seem, do not provide the answers. They remain what they are: questions.”

See the full column at the Washington Post.

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Armed ‘sovereign citizen extremist’ arrested at Boston train station: report

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Authorities in Boston arrested an armed extremist at a train station on Thanksgiving.

"A Boston man was arrested last night and charged with illegally carrying a loaded pistol. The defendant, who allegedly purchased a firearm and body armor, and material that could be used to assemble explosives, adheres to the anti-government/anti-authority sovereign citizen extremist ideology," the Department of Justice announced Friday. "Pepo Herd El a/k/a Pepo Wamchawi Herd (El), 47, of Dorchester, was charged by criminal complaint with one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition."

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Texas Republican hasn’t even been sworn in yet and already a GOP congressman is publicly dunking on him

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There was some drama on Twitter on Friday when a four-term Republican congressman dunked on a Texas Republican who won a seat in Congress but has yet to be sworn in.

It started when Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) urged President Donald Trump to pardon Edward Snowden and Julian Assange.

Rep.-elect Tony Gonzales (R-TX) called out Gabbard for being "full of more than just turkey."

Snowden and Assange are Russian agents who pose a direct threat to US National interests. Clearly @TulsiGabbard is full of more than just turkey. https://t.co/RI4XgdZRUy

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2020 Election

Biden’s lead in Milwaukee increases after Trump blew millions on Wisconsin recount: report

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President-elect Joe Biden's lead over Donald Trump in Wisconsin extended on Friday as Milwaukee finished their recount.

The Trump campaign had to pay $3 million for the recount in Wisconsin.

"Milwaukee County concludes its recount of the presidential election -- one of two counties where Trump sought a recount in Wisconsin. The results: Biden's lead, currently at about 20,000 statewide, grew by 132 votes," Rosalind Helderman of The Washington Post reported Friday.

Edward-Isaac Dovere of The Atlantic did a quick, back-of-the-envelope economic analysis.

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