Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump mocks Biden for vowing to ‘listen to the scientists’ as coronavirus cases surge in most states

Published

on

Senator Lindsey Graham smiles behind President Trump at the rally in the Bojangle's Coliseum. (Jeffery Edwards / Shutterstock.com)

Speaking to a largely maskless crowd of supporters in Carson City, Nevada late Sunday, President Donald Trump mocked Democratic nominee Joe Biden for vowing to “listen to the scientists” on the Covid-19 pandemic if elected in November and boasted about his own refusal to heed the advice of experts even as coronavirus cases and deaths continue to surge nationwide.

ADVERTISEMENT

“If I listened totally to the scientists, we would right now have a country that would be in a massive depression,” Trump said, neglecting to mention that the U.S. is, in fact, currently in the midst of an unprecedented economic downturn.

“We’re like a rocket ship, take a look at the numbers,” the president added, remarks that came just days after the Labor Department reported that another 1.3 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits during the week ending October 10. According to data from the Census Bureau, nearly 80 million U.S. adults are struggling to afford basic necessities such as food and rent.

Watch Trump’s comments:

The Biden campaign and allies of the former vice president were quick to respond to Trump’s attack, which was in line with the president’s repeated dismissals of expert recommendations and basic public health guidelines as the coronavirus pandemic continues to ravage the country.

Ronald Klain, Biden’s former chief of staff who led the Obama administration’s Ebola response, tweeted, “Trump admits he doesn’t listen to scientists. No wonder the U.S. leads the world in Covid deaths.”

Biden campaign spokesperson Andrew Bates called Trump’s remarks “tellingly out of touch and the polar opposite of reality.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“Trump crashed the strong economy he inherited from the Obama-Biden administration by lying about and attacking the science, and layoffs are rising,” Bates said.

The president’s anti-science rhetoric, policies, and personnel moves—which have included the installation of political officials at federal public health agencies—have led nonpartisan publications and groups like Scientific American and the National Academy of Sciences to publicly criticize Trump, in some cases, call for his ouster in November.

“Policymaking must be informed by the best available evidence without it being distorted, concealed, or otherwise deliberately miscommunicated,” the nonpartisan National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine said in a joint statement last month. “We find ongoing reports and incidents of the politicization of science, particularly the overriding of evidence and advice from public health officials and the derision of government scientists, to be alarming.”

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

GOP senator knows Trump lost but thinks it would be ‘political suicide’ to admit it: report

Published

on

Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) is still spouting conspiracy theories about the election being "stolen" from President Donald Trump -- but according to one former Wisconsin Republican official, Johnson understands that Trump lost.

Mark Becker, the former Chairman of the Brown County Republican Party, writes at The Bulwark that he had a conversation with Johnson after the election in which the senator acknowledged Trump's defeat.

However, Johnson said that he was loath to admit it publicly because of the strong support the president had received from Wisconsin GOP voters, despite the fact that the president narrowly lost the state this year.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

‘Whiny kid’ Trump’s tantrums over election loss getting ignored by Pennsylvania swing county voters

Published

on

President Donald Trump's attempts to overturn the results of the 2020 election are being met with shrugs in a key Pennsylvania swing county that helped deliver the state to President-elect Joe Biden this year.

The New York Times reports that many Biden voters in Bucks County say they aren't worried about Trump's frantic efforts to get hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvania votes tossed out.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Donald Trump PAC has pocketed most of the cash he bilked from his supporters to fund election lawsuits: report

Published

on

President Donald Trump has raised about $170 million from his aggressive fundraising campaign ostensibly aimed at fueling his baseless election challenges, but the majority of the money is actually going to the new political action committee he set up after the election, according to The New York Times.

Trump has bombarded supporters with appeals for cash as he wages a fruitless legal campaign to challenge the results of an election he lost by more than 6 million votes. But the president's attorneys have failed to back up his allegations of fraud and irregularities with any actual evidence.

Continue Reading