Quantcast
Connect with us

Virus ‘out of control’ among Brazil’s Yanomami people

Published

on

The Yanomami people live in remote areas of the Amazon AFP : POOLjpg

The spread of the new coronavirus is “completely out of control” on the Yanomami indigenous reservation in Brazil, where cases have nearly quadrupled in three months, according to a report published Thursday.

The Yanomami, like all indigenous peoples in the Amazon rainforest, have little historic exposure to outside diseases, and have a tragic history of being devastated by epidemics.

ADVERTISEMENT

The report by a coalition of indigenous rights groups found virus cases on the reservation had surged from 335 in August to 1,202 in October, with 23 confirmed or suspected deaths.

“Social distancing is impossible in indigenous villages, so around 10,000 Yanomami and Ye’kuana may have been exposed to the new coronavirus, more than one-third of the total population” on the reservation the two groups share, the report said.

“The situation is completely out of control,” it added.

The researchers’ figures are higher than the official ones from the Brazilian health ministry, which reports 1,050 cases and nine deaths for the territory.

The reservation, the largest in Brazil, is home to around 27,000 people.

ADVERTISEMENT

It registered its first coronavirus cases and death in April.

Indigenous rights groups blame illegal gold miners for bringing the disease onto the reservation, and accuse far-right President Jair Bolsonaro of failing to address the problem.

Overall, 39,647 indigenous people have been infected by the new coronavirus in the country, and 877 have died, according to the Association of Brazil’s Indigenous Peoples (APIB).

ADVERTISEMENT

Brazil has the second-highest death toll in the pandemic, after the United States, with more than 167,000 people killed.

The country is home to an estimated 800,000 indigenous people from more than 300 ethnic groups.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Brazilian Amazon is home to at least 100 isolated tribes, more than anywhere else in the world, according to indigenous rights group Survival International.

The Yanomami, who are known for their face paint and intricate piercings, number around 27,000.

Largely isolated from the outside world until the mid-20th century, they were devastated by diseases such as measles and malaria in the 1970s.

ADVERTISEMENT

© 2020 AFP


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Oklahoma doctor warns ‘unless we have a smart Thanksgiving we’re going to have a sad Christmas’

Published

on

Things are so bad in Oklahoma that one doctor is warning the holidays are going to be particularly bad for families who will be mourning loved ones.

Speaking to MSNBC on Monday, NBC News reporter Morgan Chesky said that daily COVID-19 infections have gone up 140 percent while hospitalizations have increased in the state by 130 percent, so far.

"We're seeing cases of patients having to wait up to 24 hours just to get a bed," said Chesky. "And we know that staffing, they are fatigued and worn down simply because the numbers keep going up in spite of the fact that the CDC has recommended not to travel, we know that people all across the nation are going ahead and packing the airports, attending the mass gatherings."

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Delayed transition now causing problems in FBI getting permanent clearance for Biden’s national security

Published

on

President-elect Joe Biden has announced that the delayed transition isn't a problem and that he and his team will ultimately be fine. But experts have questioned how it couldn't be an inconvenience that would lead to problems for incoming national security and public health officials, The Atlantic reported Monday.

Biden has worked to raise money for the transition, telling supporters that since they don't have access to the funds for incoming presidents, that they need donations to make it.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Terrorism expert details the rise — and fall — of Trump’s death cult

Published

on

In 1978 cult leader Jim Jones convinced 909 of his brainwashed followers in Jonestown, Guyana to drink cyanide-laced Kool Aid and kill themselves. Since that shocking collective suicide, the term “drinking the Kool Aid” has become a metaphor for anyone who has been seduced by someone else to do something irrational or self-injurious.

This story first appeared at History News Network.

Flash forward to 2020, when Republican senator Bob Corker fretted of Trump’s takeover of the Republican Party: “It’s becoming a cultish thing, isn’t it? It’s not a good place for any party to end up with a cultlike situation.” It is widely accepted even by many Republicans that Trump launched a cult-like movement, one that in this case called on his followers not to drink Kool Aid, but to inject disinfectant to “knock it [Coronavirus] out” and to seek medically unproven and potentially lethal treatments with hydroxychloroquine. As the head of an anti-science cult, Trump openly mocked and attacked medical scientists and encouraged his followers to avoid the advice of his own CDC (Centers for Disease Control) and frontline doctors and nurses. These medical professionals, it should be recalled, pleaded with the public to help them in their desperate fight to save lives by simply wearing masks and practicing social distancing.

Continue Reading