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Study suggests the COVID-19 pandemic has altered Americans attitudes toward inequality and the poor

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The coronavirus pandemic may have altered how many people in the United States view the poor, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. The study indicates that people became more likely to blame external factors for poverty and less likely to blame personal failings after the outbreak of the virus.Based on their previous research, the authors of the new study had reason to believe that the pandemic might alter attitudes about the poor and inequality.“My co-authors and I recently published a paper in Nature Human Behavior in which we found that one r…

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Oklahoma doctor warns ‘unless we have a smart Thanksgiving we’re going to have a sad Christmas’

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Things are so bad in Oklahoma that one doctor is warning the holidays are going to be particularly bad for families who will be mourning loved ones.

Speaking to MSNBC on Monday, NBC News reporter Morgan Chesky said that daily COVID-19 infections have gone up 140 percent while hospitalizations have increased in the state by 130 percent, so far.

"We're seeing cases of patients having to wait up to 24 hours just to get a bed," said Chesky. "And we know that staffing, they are fatigued and worn down simply because the numbers keep going up in spite of the fact that the CDC has recommended not to travel, we know that people all across the nation are going ahead and packing the airports, attending the mass gatherings."

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2020 Election

Delayed transition now causing problems in FBI getting permanent clearance for Biden’s national security

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President-elect Joe Biden has announced that the delayed transition isn't a problem and that he and his team will ultimately be fine. But experts have questioned how it couldn't be an inconvenience that would lead to problems for incoming national security and public health officials, The Atlantic reported Monday.

Biden has worked to raise money for the transition, telling supporters that since they don't have access to the funds for incoming presidents, that they need donations to make it.

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Terrorism expert details the rise — and fall — of Trump’s death cult

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In 1978 cult leader Jim Jones convinced 909 of his brainwashed followers in Jonestown, Guyana to drink cyanide-laced Kool Aid and kill themselves. Since that shocking collective suicide, the term “drinking the Kool Aid” has become a metaphor for anyone who has been seduced by someone else to do something irrational or self-injurious.

This story first appeared at History News Network.

Flash forward to 2020, when Republican senator Bob Corker fretted of Trump’s takeover of the Republican Party: “It’s becoming a cultish thing, isn’t it? It’s not a good place for any party to end up with a cultlike situation.” It is widely accepted even by many Republicans that Trump launched a cult-like movement, one that in this case called on his followers not to drink Kool Aid, but to inject disinfectant to “knock it [Coronavirus] out” and to seek medically unproven and potentially lethal treatments with hydroxychloroquine. As the head of an anti-science cult, Trump openly mocked and attacked medical scientists and encouraged his followers to avoid the advice of his own CDC (Centers for Disease Control) and frontline doctors and nurses. These medical professionals, it should be recalled, pleaded with the public to help them in their desperate fight to save lives by simply wearing masks and practicing social distancing.

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