All wet: How NYC must adapt to a future of extreme flooding
Commuters walk into a flooded 3rd Avenue/ 149th Street subway station and disrupted service due to extremely heavy rainfall from the remnants of Hurricane Ida on Sept. 2, 2021, in New York City. - David Dee Delgado/Getty Images North America/TNS

As refreshing as it was to see New York Gov. Kathy Hochul and NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio standing shoulder to shoulder to commit to attacking a problem (OK, not exactly shoulder to shoulder; he’s 6-foot-5 and she’s not), it’s way too late for either the city or state to do anything about the catastrophic flooding that drenched New York Wednesday night, killing more than a dozen people, crippling the subways and destroying untold amounts of property. The necessary tasks now are drying out and assessing the damage, followed in short order by marshaling all the resources available from the federal ...