‘Hocus pocus’ or sound science? Can brain mapping save Nikolas Cruz from death row?
Florida school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz quickly glances up at the prosecutors during a hearing on April 27, 2018, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. - Taimy Alvarez/Pool/Getty Images North America/TNS

MIAMI — Over a decade ago, a “brain-mapping” technology known as QEEG was first used in a Florida death penalty case, helping keep a convicted Miami killer off death row by swaying jurors that brain damage had left him prone to violence. In the years since, brain mapping remains very much a legal gray area, inconsistently accepted in a small number of death penalty cases across the state. In some, prosecutors fought it as junk science and judges agreed to block results. In others, prosecutors raised no objections to the tests. The questions surrounding brain mapping will soon be on trial again...