Israel: Iran weeks away from weapons-grade nuclear material
Israeli Defence Minister Benny Gantz (L) and Foreign Minister Yair Lapid attend a meeting with ambassadors of the countries on the United Nations Security Council at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, convened following a fatal attack on a tanker in the Gulf of Oman. Israel warned on Wednesday that its arch-enemy Iran is weeks away from acquiring weapons-grade nuclear material. -/Ministry of Foreign Affairs/dpa
Israeli Defence Minister Benny Gantz (L) and Foreign Minister Yair Lapid attend a meeting with ambassadors of the countries on the United Nations Security Council at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, convened following a fatal attack on a tanker in the Gulf of Oman. Israel warned on Wednesday that its arch-enemy Iran is weeks away from acquiring weapons-grade nuclear material. -/Ministry of Foreign Affairs/dpa

Israel warned on Wednesday that its arch-enemy Iran is weeks away from acquiring weapons-grade nuclear material.

"Iran has violated all of the guidelines set in the JCPOA and is only around 10 weeks away from acquiring weapons-grade materials necessary for a nuclear weapon," Israeli Defence Minister Benny Gantz said, using the acronym for Iran's 2015 nuclear deal.

He was speaking at a meeting of ambassadors of the countries on the United Nations Security Council, convened following a fatal attack on a tanker in the Gulf of Oman.

Israel, Romania, Britain and the United States blame Iran for the attack, while Tehran denies any involvement.

The dispute around Iran's 2015 nuclear deal is one many reasons for tensions in the Middle East, which have increased in recent years.

Israel considers its very existence to be threatened by Iran's nuclear programme, which Tehran says is for peaceful purposes only.

Under the 2015 accord, Iran committed to produce only low-enriched uranium as fuel for nuclear reactors, in return for wide-ranging sanctions relief.

The US unilaterally exited the deal in 2018, prompting Tehran to increase its uranium enrichment and restrict international inspections of its nuclear sites.

For several months now, the remaining parties to the deal - Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China - have been trying to bring Tehran and Washington back into compliance with the deal.

The comments come a day ahead of the inauguration of Ebrahim Raisi as the Islamic Republic's new president. A chief question for many outsiders has been how his more conservative course will impact the nuclear talks.

Israeli Defence Minister Benny Gantz (4th R) and Foreign Minister Yair Lapid (3rd R) attend a meeting with ambassadors of the countries on the United Nations Security Council at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, convened following a fatal attack on a tanker in the Gulf of Oman. Israel warned on Wednesday that its arch-enemy Iran is weeks away from acquiring weapons-grade nuclear material. -/Ministry of Foreign Affairs/dpa