These are the symptoms 'long-haul' Covid patients suffer from
Long Covid rehab facilities like this one in Germany help people to retrain their endurance. Even months after a coronavirus infection, some even asymptomatic, people are suffering from a wide variety of Long Covid symptoms. Sina Schuldt/dpa/Archiv
Long Covid rehab facilities like this one in Germany help people to retrain their endurance. Even months after a coronavirus infection, some even asymptomatic, people are suffering from a wide variety of Long Covid symptoms. Sina Schuldt/dpa/Archiv

People with Long Covid are confronted with a wide variety of symptoms, from heart trouble to concentration problems, according to health care experts in rehab centres for people struggling with the long-term effects of coronavirus infection.

"There is by no means just one clinical picture - in our facilities we have to deal with a whole host of different symptoms," says the President of the German Pension Insurance Association, Gundula Rossbach.

"We are noticing more and more that people are not only currently suffering from Covid-19, but many develop post-Covid or Long Covid syndrome later on," Rossbach says. "Many patients first have to realise that it is Long Covid."

According to a study published in December by the Mainz University Medical Centre in Germany, around 40 per cent of those infected with the coronavirus still have symptoms more than six months later.

According to the study, Long Covid also affects people whose infections passed with mild or even no symptoms.

"The complaints are non-specific - including heart problems, concentration problems, shortness of breath, anxiety disorders, depression and chronic fatigue," Rossbach says.

Some of those affected are torn out of their professional lives, while others can no longer concentrate and, for example, no longer understand texts, sometimes even months after the actual illness.

Depending on the symptom, the person can go into rehabilitation at clinics for cardiology, neurology or psychosomatics.

"In many cases, we are entering new territory here because there is a lack of well-founded empirical data," says Rossbach.