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Balloon boy family posted video of fake terror attack on US capitol

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The family of the six-year-old boy who was allegedly trapped in a runaway hot air balloon Thursday has previously posted videos on YouTube that depict a fake terror attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Heene family father Richard, has used the online identity “The Psyience Detectives,” to post videos in the past, including one from January 2008 which depicts an alleged terror attack on the U.S. Capitol. A description filed with the video describes it as only “An under-budgeted Iraqi terrorist group posing as a defensive driving school failed at launching missiles at the United States Capitol.” It shows smoke coming out of a car that appears to be near the U.S. Capitol, accompanied by the sound of rockets or missiles swooshing through the air. Meanwhile,  a man is saying “What the f*** is that? What the f***? Whoa. What the f***? Jesus Christ. What’s going on?”

The video is tagged “parody spoof prank” and posted under the label “comedy.”

The Colorado Heene family notified authorities Thursday that they believed their son, Falcon, had climbed into a helium balloon made by father Richard Heene, and taken flight. As the country watched the boy seem to float away, Colorado rescue workers brought the balloon down to safety, only to discover later on that the boy was hiding in an attic over the family’s garage.

As Raw Story reported early Friday, Heene’s son, Falcon,  got sick Friday morning while answering questions on two morning shows.

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The Heene family’s “balloon saga” has drawn new attention after the child remarked to his father in one interview with CNN Thursday, “You had said we did this for a show,” a comment his father quickly disavowed.

After being questioned about the comment, Falcon said he felt sick during an interview with ABC’s Diane Sawyer. He was then led offstage.

In an interview with Good Morning America Friday, the local sheriff said that filing a false report — if the family knew that the child wasn’t aboard the balloon — could be a misdemeanor offense.

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Richard Heene has said the balloon incident was “Absolutely not, absolutely not” a hoax.

“Now I’m starting to get a little ticked off,” Heene retorted. “What do I have to gain about this. I’m not selling anything. I’m not advertising anything.”

Archived internet screen shots show Heene, under the name Psyience Detectives, has previously tried to sell a series of videos called “Fake or Real” on the internet. In another “Fake or Real” clip posted on Youtube he says he believes John F. Kennedy Jr. faked his own death and whether Hillary Clinton is a reptile.

In addition, TMZ reported Friday afternoon that the Heene family, which has appeared on the reality show “Wife Swap,” has been lobbying production companies and networks including TLC to create a reality show series about their lives.

Larimer County Sheriff Alderden said during a Friday afternoon press conference that he believed Heene family members were sincere in their requests for help. He noted, however, that Richard Heene called the FAA, then the local television station—apparently thinking they had a helicopter in the air nearby—and 911 about 20 minutes later. Alderden said he plans to re-interview family members after the child’s comments on television.

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Keene posted video of alleged terrorist attack

This video is from YouTube, broadcast Jan. 7, 2008.

Keene: Was JFK Jr. crash faked?

This video is from YouTube, broadcast Jan. 13, 2008.

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How Teach for America evolved into an arm of the charter school movement

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When the Walton Family Foundation announced in 2013 that it was donating $20 million to Teach For America to recruit and train nearly 4,000 teachers for low-income schools, its press release did not reveal the unusual terms for the grant.

Documents obtained by ProPublica show that the foundation, a staunch supporter of school choice and Teach For America’s largest private funder, was paying $4,000 for every teacher placed in a traditional public school — and $6,000 for every one placed in a charter school. The two-year grant was directed at nine cities where charter schools were sprouting up, including New Orleans; Memphis, Tennessee; and Los Angeles.

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Quantum physics experiment shows Heisenberg was right about uncertainty — in a certain sense

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The word uncertainty is used a lot in quantum mechanics. One school of thought is that this means there’s something out there in the world that we are uncertain about. But most physicists believe nature itself is uncertain.

Intrinsic uncertainty was central to the way German physicist Werner Heisenberg, one of the originators of modern quantum mechanics, presented the theory.

He put forward the Uncertainty Principle that showed we can never know all the properties of a particle at the same time.

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Why do conservatives hate Oberlin College so much?

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When I was an undergraduate at Oberlin in the mid-Aughts, there was a student in my class year who was obsessed with 19th-century British Royal Naval culture. Every Friday evening, he would host a sing-along in a dorm lounge, for which he would bring xeroxes of historical sea shanty lyrics and pass them around so that we could sing along, waving our glasses of “grog.” This was a semi-established event — he had distributed flyers around campus advertising the weekly British Royal Naval sea-shanty singalong and grog-drinking event, which would extend late into the night. Though he was not a resident of the dorm where it took place, he was welcomed into the lounge by its members, and became a fixture of sorts.Like many well-endowed liberal arts schools in rural areas, Oberlin College functions as a sort of de facto social welfare state, and is designed to encourage and cultivate one’s passions, even if they are not strictly academic. Thus, after writing up a proposal for the student-run activities board, the same student, the British Royal Navy culture guy, was able to plan, organize and execute a ticketed Royal Naval Ball, held in the atrium of the science center. The event featured 20 dishes of authentic British era-appropriate cuisine, cooked by student chefs, several courses of wine and port, and a violinist present to play period-specific music. The whole affair culminated with a traditional, British partner line dance — its sole inauthenticity the fact that we didn’t pay attention to our dance partners’ genders the way the Brits would have.
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