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Palin says ‘Yes we can’ to ‘drill, baby, drill’ in National Review

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One-time Alaska Gov. and GOP vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin argues in a National Review column Friday that environmentalists are working against their own interests by blocking domestic drilling, which forces the U.S. to import oil from countries with no environmental-protection laws.

“Those who oppose domestic drilling are motivated primarily by environmental considerations, but many of the countries we’re forced to import from have few if any environmental-protection laws, and those that do exist often go unenforced,” her column reads. “In effect, American environmentalists are preventing responsible development here at home while supporting irresponsible development overseas.”

In her article, Palin says the U.S. needs to “drill here and drill now” because “building an energy-independent Amer­ica will mean a real economic stimulus,” and “decreasing our dependence on foreign sources of energy will reduce the impact of world events on our economy.”

She credits herself and her home state for showing the country how oil drilling can become synonymous with energy conservation, claiming 20 percent of Alaska’s electricity comes from renewable resources. Palin also says the U.S. needs to build more oil refineries at home, lamenting that “due to major environmental restrictions, we haven’t built a major new refinery since 1976” and the number of U.S. refineries has sunk to 150 from roughly 300 in the 1970s.

The column appeared in the National Review just as Gallup was reporting that Palin’s popularity has hit an all-time low. The pollsters report that just 40 percent of the American public they surveyed see her favorably, while 50 percent have an unfavorable view of her. According to Gallup, her popularity ratings are the lowest they’ve been since she hit the national stage a little more than a year ago at the Republican convention and scored a 53 percent favorability rating.

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As the former vice-presidential nominee herself tries to refurbish her image, she equates energy independence with “freedom and confidence.”

“It’s about building a more secure and peaceful America, an America in which our energy needs will not be subject to the whims of nature, currency speculators, or madmen in possession of vast oil reserves…,” she concludes. “There’s no getting around the fact that we still need to “drill, baby, drill!” And if those in D.C. say otherwise, we need to tell them: “Yes, we can!”

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Commentary

Why do conservatives hate Oberlin College so much?

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When I was an undergraduate at Oberlin in the mid-Aughts, there was a student in my class year who was obsessed with 19th-century British Royal Naval culture. Every Friday evening, he would host a sing-along in a dorm lounge, for which he would bring xeroxes of historical sea shanty lyrics and pass them around so that we could sing along, waving our glasses of “grog.” This was a semi-established event — he had distributed flyers around campus advertising the weekly British Royal Naval sea-shanty singalong and grog-drinking event, which would extend late into the night. Though he was not a resident of the dorm where it took place, he was welcomed into the lounge by its members, and became a fixture of sorts.
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World

Raptors victory: Feel-good multiculturalism masks the reality of anti-Black racism in Canada

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During what was probably one of the most exciting and gratifying moments of his professional life, moments after the Raptors’ NBA finals victory on Thursday, a California sheriff’s deputy stopped Raptors president, Masai Ujiri from walking onto the court for the Raptors’ trophy presentation The deputy carded him and asked him for his credentials.

Even though he is the president of the Toronto Raptors’ basketball team and even though it was his own team’s victory ceremony, as a Black executive, he was treated with suspicion, as if he was trespassing.

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2020 Election

Here are 5 reasons why 2020’s down-ballot races could reshape America’s future

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The political press always tends to focus mostly on the marquee race for the White House but that's especially true this cycle, as Donald Trump runs for a second term. He demands attention and his antics enrage his opponents and delight his supporters in equal measure.

But national reporters risk missing the big picture by centering so much of their reporting at the top when many of the most important political battles in 2020 will take place further down the ballot.

Trump is catnip for reporters and their editors, but the dearth of coverage of downballot races didn't begin with his election. As the news media in general faces structural changes—with print circulation declining and much of their work moving into digital spaces that are more difficult to monetize--publishers have cut back on reporters assigned to the state and local government beat. Nevertheless, Trump has arguably worsened the trend by getting so much airtime— one estimate suggested that over the past four years, Trump has taken up, on average, 15 percent of the entire daily news cycle on the three leading cable networks, nearly three times what Obama did.

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