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ACLU: Supreme Court decision won’t end torture photos fight

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Despite efforts by all three branches of the government to keep photos of abuse at US military detention centers secret, the American Civil Liberties Union vows that it won’t stand still in the face of such a “dangerous precedent.”

The Supreme Court on Monday set aside an appeals court’s ruling that the Obama administration must release the photos, citing a new law passed in October that gives the secretary of defense the right to exempt photos from freedom-of-information laws.

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That law was passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama in October, as part of a homeland security spending bill. This month, Defense Secretary Robert Gates used his new powers to order the suppression of the photos. The case now goes back to the lower court, which will reflect on its ruling in light of the new law.

“We continue to believe that the photos should be released, and we intend to press that case in the lower court,” said Steven Shapiro, legal director of the ACLU. “No democracy has ever been made stronger by suppressing evidence of its own misconduct.”

As the ACLU noted in a statement released Monday, President Obama’s administration initially announced it would comply with a 2008 court ruling ordering the photos to be released. But the administration then changed its mind, and argued that releasing the photos could endanger the lives of Americans abroad because of the anger they would fuel.

The ACLU described that rationale as “dangerous.”

Releasing the photos would “both discourage abuse in the future and underscore the need for a comprehensive investigation of past abuses,” said Jameel Jaffer, head of the ACLU’s National Security Project. “And we continue to believe that permitting the government to suppress information about government misconduct on the grounds that someone, somewhere in the world, might react badly – or even violently – sets a very dangerous precedent.”

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At issue in the case are several dozen photos that reportedly show acts of extreme abuse carried out against prisoners at US military facilities. Raw Story has previously reported that the photos allegedly show sexual assaults on prisoners, both male and female, using truncheons, wire and phosphorescent tubes; the rape of a female prisoner by a male guard; the rape of a male prisoner by a male translator; and the rape of a 15-year-old boy.

Even former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld called the recorded abuse “cruel,” “inhuman” and “blatantly sadistic.”

The ACLU has been fighting in the courts to have the photos released since 2005, when a district court ruled that the government did not show cause for why the photos should be kept secret. Since then, successive administrations have fought that ruling in appeals courts, for the most part losing their appeals until Monday’s Supreme Court ruling.

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Dershowitz is running a ‘bizarro defense’ of Trump: Harvard Law colleague says ‘Alan is just completely wacko’

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Two of the most famous names associated with Harvard Law School had competing appearances on MSNBC on Friday.

It began when Alan Dershowitz, a professor emeritus, was interviewed MSNBC chief legal correspondent Ari Melber about his new role officially representing President Donald Trump during the Senate impeachment trial.

Dershowitz claimed that neither abuse of power nor obstruction of Congress count as "high crimes" under the constitution.

Professor Alan Dershowitz, who has also been associated with Harvard Law for five decades, was asked about Dershowitz's argument during an interview with Chris Hayes.

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Why was Lev Parnas wearing a ‘Presidential Service Badge’ awarded to troops who serve in the White House?

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Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist Maggie Haberman posted a fascinating update about a photo of impeachment figure Lev Parnas.

The photo shows Igor Fruman -- who, like Parnas, is under federal indictment -- sitting closely next to Rudy Giuliani and Parnas.

Haber said a source informed her that in the picture, Parnas can be seen wearing a "Presidential Service Badge," linking to the Wikipedia entry on the pin.

"The Presidential Service Badge (PSB) is an identification badge of the United States Armed Forces which is awarded to members of the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard as well as other members of the Uniformed Services, such as the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, who serve as full-time military staff to the President of the United States," Wikipedia explained.

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Trump’s big-money Florida fundraiser expected to bring in $10 million — from only 100 people

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President Donald Trump flew to Mar-a-Lago on Friday after receiving a formal summons from the U.S. Senate informing him of his impeachment trial.

The president will be attending a Friday evening campaign fundraiser.

The recipient of the money is Trump Victory, which is a joint fundraising committee set up by Donald J. Trump for President, Inc. and the Republican National Committee.

“Tonight’s Trump Victory fundraiser is expected to raise $10 million with approximately 100 people in attendance," the campaign told the White House pool reporter.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1218264289225728000

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