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Rick Warren won’t condemn law punishing homosexuality with death

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The conservative pastor who delivered President Barack Obama’s inaugural convocation address won’t condemn a proposed Ugandan law that punishes homosexual acts with death.

His position is raising eyebrows, not the least of which was Newsweek, which noted his position Sunday. Warren has been supportive of a Ugandan pastor behind the legislation, Martin Ssempa, hosting him during visits to the United States at his Saddleback church.

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Warren tried to distance himself from Ssempa in October, saying, “Martin Ssempa does not represent me, my wife Kay, Saddleback Church, nor the Global PEACE Plan strategy.”

But this month, asked on whether he opposed a measure under which homosexual acts are punishable by life in prison or sometimes death, Warren refused to condemn the proposal.

“The fundamental dignity of every person, our right to be free, and the freedom to make moral choices are gifts endowed by God, our creator,” Warren remarked. However, it is not my personal calling as a pastor in America to comment or interfere in the political process of other nations.”

“As a pastor, my job is to encourage, to support,” he said on Meet The Press. “I never take sides.”

Gay supporters aren’t taking buying his supposed neutrality.

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“This is a guy who called abortion a “holocaust” and who certainly does what he can to stop it in this country and around the world,” wrote blogger Michaelangelo Signorile, who hosts a show on Sirius’ OutQ radio. “Surely, he believes, as a self-proclaimed moral leader, that one must speak up against injustice. That is, if he sees state executions of gay men as a true injustice at all — or at least one that is worth upsetting the apple carts he so neatly set up in Uganda.”

The African nation of Uganda is weighing a bill that would impose the death penalty on HIV positive men who have committed what it calls “aggravated homosexuality.”

As if that were not shocking enough, a U.S. author claims that a secretive group of American politicians appear to be a driving force in seeing the proposal become law.

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The Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009, heavily supported by Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, was first read in October, triggering a wave of condemnation. According to the gay blog Queerty, Joann Lockard, public affairs officer at the Kampala, Uganda embassy, said the law would “constitute a significant step backwards for the protection of human rights in Uganda.”


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QAnon Republican’s campaign kicks journalist out of event after he covered sexist slur against Pelosi: report

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According to Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Greg Bluestein, pro-QAnon congressional candidate Marjorie Taylor Greene's campaign kicked him out of their election watch party shortly after he reported on the content of her victory speech from the primary runoff — saying that it was a closed press event.

Bluestein documented Greene attacking both mainstream Republicans and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) whom she referred to as "that b*tch."

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Small businesses in turmoil as pandemic stimulus talks stalled: report

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On Tuesday, Politico reported that small businesses are in limbo as the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) has stalled, and as the White House and Congress appear to be at a standstill on extending coronavirus stimulus.

"The collapse of pandemic relief negotiations has brought complications for the massive emergency lending program, which shut down on Saturday to new loans after doling out more than $520 billion in funds, leaving banks and borrowers unsure of how to proceed with a key phase of the rescue," reported Zachary Warmbrodt.

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2020 Election

Trump can’t attack Kamala Harris without contradicting his own message: Bakari Sellers

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On Tuesday's edition of CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360," former South Carolina lawmaker Bakari Sellers broke down why Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) poses such a challenge for President Donald Trump.

"What we're seeing with the two parties is the narrow focus is going to be on the fact that Donald Trump and the Trump campaign have no way, and they do not know how to deal, with Kamala Harris," said Sellers. "It very difficult to say 'Kamala is a cop' and be a 'law and order president.' Those two things simply do not mesh. Not only ahistorical and inaccurate, but the messages, they collide."

"But second, it shows that the Republican Party and Democratic Party are going in two vastly different directions," continued Sellers. "The country is becoming more diverse, the country is becoming more brown. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris represent the demographics of what the country will be, and Donald Trump and Steven Miller and Mike Pence represent a day that's passed. So what I would say tonight is while Donald Trump and Mike Pence want to cheer on the Confederacy, we're trying to re-imagine what this country will look like. It goes back to a time where Americans can feel good about being first and about thinking about what our country can be: full of hope and faith."

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