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Glenn Beck wants GOP to fess up like Tiger Woods

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Days after barking to protest Obama’s stimulus, Glenn Beck drew howling cheers as the keynote speaker at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington on Saturday.

“Beck says it’s still morning in America: a head-pounding, hangover morning,” the Associated Press reports. “The conservative commentator drew cheers from conservative activists Saturday night in a speech that implored Republicans to renounce profligate ways in Washington, let big banks fail and honor true conservative principles.”

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The AP article adds, “The TV and radio host said the GOP should confess its adherence to big government in the way golfer Tiger Woods admitted a problem with women – and show the same remorse.”

Huffington Post’s Sam Stein adds,

“In a winding speech that touched as much on his personal turmoil as his policies and politics, Beck had the packed auditorium at CPAC captivated from the start. Using hand gestures, multiple impersonations and his infamous chalkboard, he took the usual swipes at Democrats. “Progressivism,” he declared, “is eating the Constitution.” Moreover, it “was designed to eat the Constitution.”

“Dick Cheney a couple days ago… says it is going to be a good year for conservative ideas,” Beck told the crowd, Stein notes, as he was seen “wiping the sweat from his brow.”

Beck added, “It is going to be a very good year. But it is not enough just to not suck as much as the other side.”

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The Fox host, who is often derided as a clown by critics, embraced the analogy.

“We need a big tent,” Beck told the crowd. “Can we get a bigger tent? How can we get a big tent? What is this the circus? America is not a clown show. America is not a circus. America is an idea. America is an idea that sets people free.”

The following videos of Beck at CPAC were posted by Mediaite:

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Privacy rights may become next victim of killer pandemic

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Digital surveillance and smartphone technology may prove helpful in containing the coronavirus pandemic -- but some activists fear this could mean lasting harm to privacy and digital rights.

From China to Singapore to Israel, governments have ordered electronic monitoring of their citizens' movements in an effort to limit contagion. In Europe and the United States, technology firms have begun sharing "anonymized" smartphone data to better track the outbreak.

These moves have prompted soul-searching by privacy activists who acknowledge the need for technology to save lives while fretting over the potential for abuse.

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Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards honors staffer who died from COVID-19

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Gov. John Bel Edwards (D-LA) offered a moving tribute to a member of his staff who died from COVID-19.

"On behalf of the first lady and my entire administration, it is with heavy hearts that we mourn the loss of our dear April, who succumbed to complications from COVID-19," he posted on Twitter, along with photos.

"She brightened everyone’s day with her smile and was an inspiration to everyone who met her," he continued.

"She lived her life to the fullest and improved the lives of countless Louisianans with disabilities as a dedicated staff member in the Governor's Office of Disability Affairs. April worked hard as an advocate for herself & other members of the disability community," he wrote.

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Washington state nurses share shocking stories from their war against coronavirus

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by Ken Armstrong and Vianna Davila

Nurses at one hospital in southeastern Washington state have alleged that, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, they were ordered by supervisors to use one protective mask per shift, potentially exposing themselves to the novel coronavirus.

At another hospital, just east of Seattle, nurses had to use face shields indefinitely.

At a third hospital, on Washington’s border with Oregon, nurses reported that respirators were expired. The hospital responded, the nurses said, by ordering staff to remove stickers showing that the respirators might be as much as three years out of date.

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