Quantcast
Connect with us

Podesta joins biotech firm with patent promising liquid fuels from solar energy

Published

on

An upstart firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts said Tuesday that a high-ranking official from both the Clinton and Obama administrations would be joining their board of directors, helping them further a project that may hold the key to saving industrialized society from a long-predicted energy crunch.

The company, Joule Unlimited, was granted a patent in Sept. for their first in a series of microscopic organisms — genetically altered versions of the E. coli bacteria — that use sunlight and water in a process similar to photosynthesis to convert captured CO2 into usable crude oil.

ADVERTISEMENT

They called it “Liquid Fuel From The Sun,” which uses their “proprietary organism” to devour waste and defecate custom hydrocarbons. Joule ultimately hoped such technology could fill the gap in human energy needs as fossil fuel production declines worldwide.

It was apparently so promising that John Podesta — the current president of the Center for American Progress who served as President Bill Clinton’s former chief of staff and helped oversee President Obama’s transition into power — has joined Joule’s board of directors.

“I have seen and heard many proposals by renewable energy companies, and can unequivocally say that Joule has a technology and a system unlike any other, with industrial viability and a clear path to market within the next several years,” Podesta said in a prepared statement.

“Unlike biofuel processes that require costly intermediates such as sugar, algal or agricultural biomass, Joule is the first to achieve and patent a direct, single-step, continuous process for the production of hydrocarbon fuels requiring no raw material feedstocks – setting the stage for fossil fuel replacement at unprecedented efficiencies and costs as low as $30 per barrel equivalent,” the company said in a media advisory.

Their first modified E. coli bacteria, which produced diesel fuel, allegedly outputs more energy than it takes in. This would ultimately lead to “unlimited supplies of ethanol and hydrocarbons without the high production costs or environmental consequences,” according to Bill Sims, Joule’s president and CEO.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The result is the world’s first platform for converting sunlight and waste CO2 directly into diesel, requiring no costly intermediates, no use of agricultural land or fresh water, and no downstream processing.”

The firm similarly announced last year a breakthrough in algae fuel production, which relies of specialized plant life to grow hydrocarbons. Joule were also deeply involved in raising funds for renewable energy production facilities around the US.

Joule was founded in 2007 by Flagship Ventures, a privately held investment group that looks for the best ideas in the worlds of information, energy production and specialized technologies.

ADVERTISEMENT

Joule also counts George Church among their co-founders: he’s the Harvard Medical School geneticist who helped launch the Human Genome Project.

“There is no technology or opportunity more exciting than what we’re driving at Joule,” the company’s president said. “The call for alternative energy sources has never been greater, and Joule’s unique system will make an impact where other approaches have fallen short”.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

In a secluded region in Russia’s Arctic they are rejecting Putin in rare protest

Published

on

Lyudmila Laptander, an activist advocating autonomy for her mineral-rich Nenets region in the Russian Arctic, worries authorities are planning to sacrifice its traditions for the promise of economic enrichment.

"If Nenets is merged with another region, I worry that no one will look after our language or our traditions, and that our small villages in the tundra will be forgotten," said Laptander, 61, a member of the Yasavey cultural group.

The autonomous region on the edge of the Arctic Ocean was gripped by protests in May against the government's plans to integrate it with neighbouring Arkhangelsk.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

People are paying to hire this donkey to crash their Zoom meetings

Published

on

The coronavirus pandemic has led millions of people to embrace meetings via Zoom, but admittedly, those can be as tedious as in-person conferences.

So one animal sanctuary in Canada, in dire need of cash after being forced to close to visitors, found a way to solve both problems.

Meet Buckwheat, a donkey at the Farmhouse Garden Animal Home, who is ready to inject some fun into your humdrum work-from-home office day -- for a price.

"Hello. We are crashing your meeting, we are crashing your meeting -- this is Buckwheat," says sanctuary volunteer Tim Fors, introducing the gray and white animal on a Zoom call.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Republican senators are suddenly trying to social distance — from Trump

Published

on

There’s something interesting in today’s news:

A number of Republican Senators have said they are skipping the Republican National Convention this year. The convention was originally scheduled in Charlotte, North Carolina, but at Trump’s insistence was relocated to Jacksonville, Florida, last month. The stated reason was that Democratic North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper would not commit to permitting a full convention out of concerns about the spread of coronavirus, but the abrupt switch to Florida, less than 80 days before the convention, still seems odd to me. Regardless, the switch has created a new problem: Florida is in the midst of a dramatic spike in coronavirus cases, setting a record for new cases in a single day during the weekend —11,458—and running low of ICU beds.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image