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GOP leaders quash Republican’s effort to ban guns within 1,000 feet of lawmakers

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The top two Republicans in the House of Representatives rejected gun control legislation soon after it was announced by a senior GOP congressman, effectively dooming its hopes for consideration.

The bill, unveiled by Rep. Peter King (R-NY) on Tuesday, would have banned people from carrying guns within 1,000 feet of elected officials in Congress. It had the support of New York City mayor and outspoken gun-control advocate Michael Bloomberg.

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His announcement came days after the tragic shootings of twenty people in Tucson, Arizona on Saturday that left six dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) badly injured.

A spokesman for Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) told The Hill later in the day that the new House speaker will oppose the legislation.

Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) initially demurred, as his office declined to comment.

But when the New York Daily News later inquired, his spokesman Brad Dayspring said Cantor won’t support it. “The proposal wouldn’t have prevented this tragedy, or other mentally unstable individuals or criminals from committing horrific acts,” Dayspring explained.

For gun-control legislation to be put forth in Congress is in itself rare as of recent years, but it’s particularly remarkable coming from a Republican, whose party has positioned itself squarely on the side of the gun-rights issue.

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King, who is chairman of the homeland security committee, presented his bill as a means to improve public safety for elected leaders.

Members of Congress, he said, “do represent the people who elect them, and it’s essential, if we’re going to continue to have contact, that the public who are at these meetings are ensured of their own safety.”

And King isn’t the only one considering gun-control measures in the wake of the Arizona murders. Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY) and Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) are planning legislation that would ban high-capacity ammunition clips, like the one used by the Arizona shooter, which he purchased legally.

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US law currently forbids guns within 1,000 feet of schools.


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2020 Election

BUSTED: Border Patrol caught illegally profiling Spanish speakers in Montana because ‘nobody really has much to do’

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The Department of Homeland Security will be paying monetary damages after a shocking case of systemic racism in Montana.

Ana Suda and Martha “Mimi” Hernandez were detained by U.S. Customs and Border Protection for speaking Spanish at a Town Pump gas station in Havre, Montana.

The two U.S. citizens caught the interaction on tape and it was such a scandal it became national news.

On Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union announced that a settlement had been reached.

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Mnuchin is trying to block the Biden White House from giving Americans unspent COVID-19 funds

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Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin is part of the team of President Donald Trump's administration working to make life difficult for the incoming administration.

Bloomberg News reported Tuesday that there is about $455 billion in unspent funds from the CARES Act, which Congress passed to help Americans get through the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Mnuchin plans to place the money into the agency’s General Fund, a Treasury Department spokesperson said Tuesday. That fund can only be tapped with 'authority based on congressionally issued legislation," the report said, citing, the Treasury’s website.

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Ivanka and other advisors told Trump to ‘suck it up’ and allow the transition to proceed: report

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According to a new report from NBC News, President Trump's recent acceptance of a formal transition of power to the incoming Biden administration came after a meeting with his top advisers in the midst of growing pressure from Republicans and business leaders.

"The advisers argued that the combination of snowballing calls from Republicans in Congress to begin the transition, disastrous public appearances by attorneys Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell and mounting legal setbacks were creating a public relations problem — and that Trump needed to shift course to protect his brand,' as one ally put it," NBC News' Carol E. Lee, Peter Alexander and Hallie Jackson report.

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