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Republicans seek to quash ‘net neutrality’ rules

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WASHINGTON — Republican members of the US Senate and House of Representatives are seeking to quash rules approved by US telecom regulators designed to ensure an open Internet.

The five-member Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in a vote split on party lines, agreed in December to the rules aimed at safeguarding “network neutrality,” the principle that lawful Web traffic should be treated equally.

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Supporters have argued that the rules are needed to ensure an open Internet but opponents have decried them as unnecessary government intervention.

Republicans in the Senate and House formally introduced a matching “resolution of disapproval” on Wednesday seeking to reverse the rules.

House majority leader Eric Cantor, a Republican from Virginia, said the resolution is intended to “debunk the FCC’s harmful and partisan plan to regulate the Internet.”

“From the Internet’s inception we have taken a hands-off approach,” added Representative Greg Walden, a Republican from Oregon.

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“The Internet did not become the explosive driver of communications and economic growth it is today until we turned it over to free enterprise,” Walden said. “Changing direction now will only harm innovation and the economy.”

US carrier Verizon Communications filed a legal challenge to the FCC’s rules last month, calling them an “assertion of broad authority for sweeping new regulation of broadband networks and the Internet itself.”

The rules are a balancing act by the FCC between support for consumers and the cable and telephone companies that are the US Internet service providers.

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The FCC drafted the rules after suffering a legal setback in April when a court ruled that it had not been granted the authority by Congress to regulate the network management practices of Internet service providers.


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Giuliani’s public invitation to Ukraine to interfere in US elections opened the door for other countries to run to Trump

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President Donald Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani turned heads with his bizarre, unhinged rant on national television that effectively urged Ukraine to continue trying to gather dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden — and for news outlets to take whatever they find seriously.

As Casey Michel wrote in The Daily Beast, even if this effort ultimately fails to turn up useful opposition research against Biden, this is a profoundly dangerous development for American democracy.

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Trump whistleblower needs to go directly to FBI because Bill Barr can’t be trusted: Ex-FBI director

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Appearing on MSNBC with host Alex Witt, former FBI Assistant Director for Counterintelligence Frank Figliuzzi blew up Donald Trump's claim that he is the victim of a "Ukraine Witchhunt."

He then added that the whistleblower who went to the inspector general with a serious charge against the president should take what he has and go to the FBI within a week if nothing happens.

"We've got to get to the bottom of this, and we can't rely on leaks and certain reporters getting certain tidbits of information," the ex-FBI man explained. "This needs to be explored and it's likely this could end up in a criminal investigation."

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Trump took out DNI head Dan Coats to install a new acting director in charge of whistleblowers: CIA veteran

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Appearing on MSNBC's "AM Joy," a longtime veteran CIA official said the whistleblower, who ran to the inspector general with a complaint about Donald Trump asking Ukraine's president for dirt on Joe Biden, should expect the president and his aides to come after them.

Speaking with host Joy Reid, Jonna Mendez said she saw the first warnings signs that something was up in the U.S. intelligence community when the president forced DNI head Dan Coats and his top deputy out.

"Through the lens of someone who spent 27 years at the CIA, the thing that caught my eye instantly was Dan Coats' resignation follow by Sue Gordon," Mendez explained. "The fact that Dan Coats went into a meeting and said 'Sue, you've got to resign' and that she did, truncating a career that clearly hadn't reached its zenith."

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