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DISH Satellite Network to compete with Netflix

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SAN FRANCISCO — US satellite television provider DISH Network has teamed with Blockbuster to stream films in a challenge to online video rental giant Netflix.

DISH on Friday said it will charge monthly subscriptions of $10 for a “Blockbuster Movie Pass” that lets people stream films or television shows as well as rent DVDs and videogames.

“With millions of Internet-enabled DISH Network set-top boxes deployed in US homes and our ability to offer services from the iconic Blockbuster brand, we are uniquely positioned to take advantage of the myriad of ways consumers seek access to their favorite movies, TV shows or games,” DISH chief executive Joe Clayton said in a release.

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The announcement came as Netflix sought to make amends with subscribers upset at a new pricing scheme which resulted in a whopping increase for many customers.

Netflix is separating its DVD rental service from its online streaming unit and apologizing for the handling of the price hike.

Chief executive Reed Hastings made no change to the new pricing scheme but apologized for botching communications surrounding the move.

Netflix announced in July that online streaming and DVD-by-mail service that previously cost subscribers $10 per month will jump to $16 monthly. Subscribers can also opt to sign on for one service or the other for $8 a month.

The DVD service will be renamed Qwikster “because it refers to quick delivery” and Netflix will be used for video streaming. Customers who get both will receive two separate charges.

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The Los Gatos, California-based Netflix also said it would be adding videogames to Qwikster offerings.

“We’ve created a package that combines the best assets of the movie entertainment and video gaming industries with the convenience and integration provided by a multichannel video provider,” Blockbuster president Michael Kelly said of the Netflix rival to launch in October.

Copyright © 2011 AFP. All rights reserved.

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Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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‘The country got an education’: Nicolle Wallace explains why impeachment could move public opinion

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MSNBC anchor Nicolle Wallace offered her analysis after the day of televised hearings in the impeachment inquiry.

Wallace, who served as White House communications director under President George W. Bush, drew upon her experience as a top Republican strategist.

"Listen, I haven’t spent a nanosecond in a courtroom, but I’ve spent my career in the court of public opinion. And if you look at what the Democrats have set out to do and you look at why this has swung public opinion in a way the Mueller probe never did is that they have laid brick on top of brick on top of brick," Wallace explained.

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Room erupts in laughter as Democrat Peter Welch destroys Jim Jordan during impeachment hearing

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There was a moment of levity four-hours into the first televised hearing in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), the bombastic Freedom Caucus member who was added to the committee at the last moment by Republicans, had argued that the White House whistleblower started the scandal.

"There’s one witness, one witness that they won’t bring in front of us, they won’t bring in front of the American people, and that’s the guy who started it all, the whistleblower," Jordan argued.

Unfortunately for the wrestling coach turned politician, Jordan was followed by Rep. Peter Welch (D-VT).

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Constitutional law expert Laurence Tribe succinctly debunks Jim Jordan’s defense of Trump

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Constitutional law expert Laurence Tribe debunked the key defense of President Donald Trump that was offered by Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) during the first televised hearing in the impeachment inquiry.

Jordan did not address the fact President Donald Trump solicited foreign election interference in violation of federal law, but attempted to debunk the additional charge that there was extortion/bribery.

The Ohio Republican argued that there could not have been a quid pro quo because the aid was eventually released.

But Tribe, who has taught at Harvard Law for half a century and argued three dozen cases before the United States Supreme Court, fact-checked the congressman who never passed the bar exam.

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