Quantcast
Connect with us

Santorum comes in first in Missouri, Minnesota and Colorado GOP primary races

Published

on

Former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA) won the Missouri GOP primary and the Minnesota and Colorado causes on Tuesday. He maintained a tremendous margin over front-runner former Governor Mitt Romney (R-MA) in Missouri, with Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) taking up the lead in Missouri. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-GA) didn’t appear on the ballot in that state and Santorum was the only candidate who appeared in the state of late. In Minnesota, however, Paul beat Romney and Gingrich in the caucuses by a significant margin. Romney came in a relatively close second in Colorado with Paul and then Gingrich trailing.

Gingrich missed the deadline to be on the ballot in Missouri last November, though his campaign later claimed they had intentionally neglected the state. Missouri marks Santorum’s first win since Iowa, and his first night-of win to date. Analysts expect it will allow him to more credibly claim to be a conservative alternative to Gingrich, especially in the wake of Gingrich’s odd Saturday evening press conference and his attacks on Romney’s record as a successful businessman.

Santorum spoke in Missouri after the race in Minnesota was called for him, thanking God “for our ability to persevere through the dog days,” his wife (whom he kissed on stage), his kids, his supporters whose votes, he said, “I suspect were heard particularly loudly in Massachusetts,” and the tea partiers who he claimed were the “base of the conservative movement.” Santorum then turned to attacking Obama who, he said, he suspected wasn’t listening because, “Has he ever listened to the voice of the American people?” Santorum went on to say that “he thinks he’s better than you,” a refrain he repeated throughout his speech. He promised, too, that Romney had “the same positions as Obama” on everything from cap and trade to the Wall Street bailouts.

Santorum picked up a theme from his competitor, Gingrich, adding that “Tonight we have an example of what a race looks like when a candidate isn’t outspent 5 to 1 and isn’t subject to negative ads that attack his character,” adding that Romney won’t be able to outspend and out-organize Obama in the fall. And, he added, his campaign was doing well because of his economic plan which he said proved that, “I don’t care about the 99 percent, rich or poor, I care about 100 percent of Americans.” Santorum then turned to the oft-heard complaint from conservatives about the Obama administration’s decision to force religious employers to provide contraceptive coverage to their employees, saying, “When the government gives you rights, unlike when God gives you rights, the government can take you away,” accusing the Administration of actively discriminating against Catholics.

Paul spoke next, telling his supporters that “we have a very strong second place,” and trumpeting a recent Reuters poll that places him second. He then trumpeted his delegate count despite his second-place finish, and told his supporters, “It must be much more fun believing in something than just campaigning for nothing.” He then proceeded to outline those beliefs, from his $1 trillion budget cuts the first year to his foreign policy positions to civil liberties to his demands to “bring our troops home” to save money. And, of course, no Paul speech would be complete without a call to audit and curtail the Fed and to end fiat currency.

Romney spoke last at 11:33 ET, before the results of the Colorado caucus were announced, noting (as did the political reporters present) that his room was fairly empty. He said he expected to come in first or second, and congratulated Santorum on his wins in Missouri and Minnesota. Then, as is his wont, he proceeded to attack Obama and Obama’s speech at the Democratic Convention in Denver in 2008, reminding people that Obama had then defined progress as “how many people can find a job that pays a mortgage,” nothing “more Americans had lost their jobs during Obama’s term than any president in modern history and more Americans had lost their homes than under any president in modern history.” He added that Obama defined progress by “whether the average American family sees their income go up,” but, Romney said, median household income had fallen. Romney cited Obama’s other promises on giving entrepreneurs opportunities and reducing the need to rely on the social safety net.

ADVERTISEMENT

Romney went on to note that “I am the only person in this race that hasn’t spent time in Washington,” a not-so-veiled reference to Gingrich’s claims that he is a Washington outsider, hitting those serving on everything from their spending habits to “voting for their own pay increases” to the many broken promises to abide by term limits (an original item in Gingrich’s much-hailed Contract With America).

Romney then rounded up with a number of anecdotes about his father, including about his love of spitting actual nails, his time as a plasterer and how he paid for his honeymoon by selling aluminum paint out of the trunk of his car, a clear parallel to Santorum’s stories of his immigrant, coal-mining grandfather. But with the Colorado race yet to be decided, Romney cut it short, thanked his supporters and ended the speech with a round of hand-shaking marred only by the Secret Service escorting a young man out of the auditorium after he reportedly attempted to glitterbomb the candidate.

[This post was updated after publication.]

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2012

Here are 7 wild, bizarre and pathetic moments from Trump’s ‘campaign launch’

Published

on

On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump held a rally that was billed as the official launch his re-election campaign — though he has never really stopped holding campaign rallies.

As expected, the president ranted, lied, and engaged in the raucous attacks that are central to his connection with Republican voters. Some of it was actually just sad, such as his continued obsession with Hillary Clinton.

Here are seven of the wildest, disturbing and pathetic moments from the rally:

1. He said Democrats "want to destroy our country as we know it."

Trump casually accuses Democrats of "want[ing] to destroy you and they want to destroy our country as we know it." pic.twitter.com/4K79KlbEeR

Continue Reading

2012

British PM candidates clash over Brexit as Boris Johnson skips debate

Published

on

Candidates to become Britain's next prime minister clashed over Brexit strategy at their first debate on Sunday but the frontrunner, Boris Johnson, dodged the confrontation.

The 90-minute debate on Channel 4 featured the five remaining candidates and an empty podium for Johnson, the gaffe-prone former foreign secretary and former mayor of London.

In sometimes ill-tempered exchanges, four of the five candidates said they would seek to renegotiate the draft Brexit divorce deal agreed with Brussels even though EU leaders have repeatedly ruled this out.

Continue Reading
 

2012

Michael Cohen ordered back to Congress on March 6

Published

on

President Donald Trump's so-called "fixer" is being asked to return to Congress for more questioning on March 6.

Outside of the closed-door committee hearing Thursday, Cohen said that the House Intelligence Committee is seeking further information, according to Washington Examiner writer Byron York.

Michael Cohen finished closed-door testimony before House Intel Committee, says he's coming back for another session March 6. Again: No reason for secrecy. Transcripts should be released ASAP.

— Byron York (@ByronYork) February 28, 2019

Continue Reading
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

 ENOUGH IS ENOUGH 

Trump endorses killing journalists, like Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Online ad networks are now targeting sites that cover acts of violence against dissidents, LGBTQ people and people of color.

Learn how you can help.
close-link