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ICANN reveals new top-level domains in London

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Proposed new top-level domains for internet addresses to rival .com and .uk will be revealed in London on Wednesday.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (Icann) received 1,930 proposals for 1,410 different internet suffixes by the 30 May deadline. There are already about 300 suffixes in use. The expansion will allow suffixes that represent hobbies, ethnic groups, corporate brand names and more. Icann has only revealed general trends so far and not specific details but some bidders have disclosed their ideas, including .lol, .bank, .baby, .music, .doctor, .YouTube and .Google.

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The new suffixes could allow businesses that joined the internet late and found desirable .com names taken to find alternatives, while others may wish to expand into multiple sites.

More than a third of the proposals, 675, came from Europe, with nearly half, 911, from North America.

The origins of the 1,930 suggestions in many ways mirror where the internet is most used. Only 17 proposals came from Africa and 24 came from Latin America and the Caribbean – areas where internet use is relatively low. But the 303 proposals from the Asia Pacific region were fewer than expected, especially given that the expansion will lift current restrictions on non-English characters and permit suffixes in Chinese, Japanese and Korean. China has the world’s largest internet population, and there was talk of creating the Chinese equivalent of .com and other popular suffixes. There were 116 proposals for suffixes using characters beyond the 26 letters used in English, Icann revealed.

Many of the 1,930 proposals were duplicates – 749 were for 229 different suffixes – while the remaining 1,181 were unique. Icann is encouraging competing bidders to work out an agreement but the organisation will hold an auction if the parties fail to reach a compromise.

After the list is published, the public will have 60 days to comment on the proposals. Someone can claim a trademark violation or argue that a proposed suffix is offensive.

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It will take at least a year or two for Icann to approve the first of the new suffixes. It will review each proposal to make sure its financial plan is sound and that contingencies exist in case a company goes out of business. Bidders must also pass criminal background checks.

Companies and groups had to pay $185,000 (£119,000) per proposal. Suffixes could potentially generate millions of dollars a year for winning bidders as they sell names ending in some of the approved names. Critics of the expansion include a coalition of business groups worried about protecting their brands in newly created names.

© Guardian News and Media 2012

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[Internet domains via Shutterstock / Oleksiy Mark]


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Colbert names Trump’s siege on DC the ‘Tinyman Square’ incident

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It wasn't quite Tiananmen Square, where a still-unknown number of Chinese protesters were murdered by the government in 1989, but it was the closest thing President Donald Trump managed to score this week.

After watching the footage of the military tear gas, beat and shoot at protesters so Trump could march from the presidential bunker to St. John's Church for the cameras.

"It was like Tiananmen Square," Colbert deemed. "Except, in Trump's case, Tinyman Square."

Trump claimed on "The Fox & Friends" that no one was tear-gassed, so it's unclear what was stinging people's eyes and making them cough, choke and tear up. The Park Police released a statement saying it wasn't tear gas. While the moment was captured on video from dozens of different camera angles, one protester actually grabbed a canister of Oleoresins Capiscum, or "OC," the gas that was used.

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Vladimir Putin must love watching the US fall apart: columnist

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New Yorker columnist Susan Glasser made the astute observation that if Russian President Vladimir Putin wanted to destabilize the United States with the election of President Donald Trump, he's clearly achieved his objective.

It was reported in March that Russian intelligence services are working to incite violence using white supremacist groups to try and sow racial chaos in the United States ahead of the November election.

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Conservative columnist links all Republicans to the attack on Lafayette Square

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Monday afternoon, President Donald Trump decided to walk across Lafayette Square for a photo-op. To get there, however, it took an outright battle with mounted park police, police covered in body armor and rattled Secret Service members who had just rushed the president to the bunker several nights before. Armed with semi-automatic weapons and military gear, they staged a siege on Lafayette Square against unarmed hippies, woke whites and people of color, again, forced to fight for justice.

Writing for the Washington Post Wednesday, conservative columnist Max Boot attacked Attorney General Bill Barr, who accepted responsibility for demanding that demonstrators be tear-gassed, beaten and shot with rubber bullets. Like Bull Conor ordering fire hoses on students marching in Birmingham, Alabama, Barr's attack on Lafayette Square for a photo-op proved he is willing to do what it takes to stroke the fractured ego of a president forced to cower in a bunker.

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