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Minn. Republican lawmaker: Homosexuality is not ‘normal behavior’

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The Republican candidate for Minnesota state House District 8B says that voters should enshrine marriage discrimination in the state’s constitution because homosexuality is not “normal behavior.”

During a debate on Thursday, Minnesota state Rep. Mary Franson (R) was asked if she supported a constitutional amendment to ban same sex marriage, which is already not legally recognized in the state.

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“You know, under current state law it is illegal for a man and a man or a female and a female to get married,” she explained. “The constitutional amendment doesn’t change anything that is in state law. All it does is give the voters a chance to decide how they want to define marriage. How do they see marriage?”

Franson added that if the amendment was passed then there would be “consequences” for public education.

“My concerns are that our children in our schools could be taught some liberal agendas because of the marriage amendment,” she insisted. “Because in the schools they may be taught that, this is normal behavior. I personally do not believe it is.”

Franson’s opponent, Alexandria coach and teacher Bob Cunniff (DFL), refused to take a stand on the amendment, but said schools don’t “don’t try to influence people on their way of thinking in that respect.”

“Massachusetts, as a matter of fact, right after the 2003 court ruling [legalizing marriage equality] there was a school-wide assembly celebrating same sex marriage,” Franson noted. “Then, and a few months later, the middle school was celebrating same sex marriage. And a year after that bill passed, schools went as far as elementary children having celebrations of the same-sex marriage, of gay pride. School books in Massachusetts, also in the libraries had this issue as normalizing it for our young children.”

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“And that’s something that I wish to protect our children from,” she concluded.

Voters go to the polls in November to decide if a ban on same sex marriage should be added to the state’s Constitution. A survey released by Public Policy Polling earlier this month found that 48 percent supported the amendment and 47 percent opposed it.

Franson came under fire earlier this year when she released a YouTube video comparing food-stanp recipients to wild animals.

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Watch this video from Pioneer Public TV (via City Pages), broadcast Sept. 20, 2012.

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2012

A harsh lesson for Trump: He can’t beat the virus — and even his followers know it

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The reviews are in and President Trump's ballyhooed return to the stage this past weekend in Tulsa was a dud. After three months on hiatus, with nothing but the increasingly disastrous coronavirus press briefings to keep him in shape, the president turned in a very shaky performance. Even his greatest hits, like "Lock her up" and "Build that wall," couldn't bring the magic.The campaign and the White House had relentlessly hyped this return, telling the media that they had a million RSVPs for the event and even planned an outdoor overflow venue where the president was slated to make a surprise visit before he entered the main stage. But the huge crowd failed to materialize and the outdoor event was hastily scrapped as it became apparent they wouldn't even come close to filling the indoor arena. Local fire marshals estimated the crowd at a little over 6,000, less than one-third the arena's capacity and 40,000 short of the crowd they anticipated outside.
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2012

Coronavirus is fostering a culture of no touching — a psychologist explains why that’s a problem

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Touch has profound benefits for human beings. But over the last few decades, people have becomeincreasingly cautious about socially touching others for a range of reasons. With the novel coronavirus spreading, this is bound to get worse. People have already started avoiding shaking hands. And the British queen was seen wearing gloves as a precautionnot to contract the virus.The coronavirus could very well have long-term implications for how hands-on we are – reinforcing already existing perceptions that touch should be avoided.Why is touch so important? It helps us share how we feel about othe... (more…)

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2012

North Carolina is a delegate prize on Super Tuesday. But it’s a complicated one

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Only two states have more Democratic delegates at stake than North Carolina on Super Tuesday. But who will get them?Well, it’s complicated.— It depends not just on how many votes a candidate gets but where he or she gets them.— In a sense, candidates still in the race will be competing with those who’ve dropped out.— And regardless of the primary outcome, so-called automatic delegates — once known as superdelegates — can support whoever they want.“Of course it’s complicated,” said University of Virginia political scientist Larry Sabato. “It doesn’t have to be that complicated... (more…)

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