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GOP lawmaker to Obama: ‘We did not elect a dictator’

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A newly elected congressman said lawmakers had a moral obligation to stop the health care law at any cost.

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) has been credited as the architect of the plan to tie funding of the Affordable Care Act to the continuing resolution to fund the federal government, a plan that led earlier this week to the legislative impasse that shut down the federal government.

“We’ve talked a whole lot in this chamber about the fact that there was a vote taken, that a president was elected – and indeed we did elect a president a mere nine months ago,” Meadows said Sunday as lawmakers debated a measure to fund the government but delay ACA for one year.

“But I want to remind you, Mr. Speaker, that I was also elected some nine months ago, and we did not elect a dictator, we elected a president,” Meadows said.

Citing the Federalist Papers, the tea party-backed Meadows urged his fellow House Republicans to use “the power of the purse … as the most complete and effectual weapon … for obtaining a redress of every grievance” – in this case, their opposition to President Barack Obama’s health care reform law.

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Meadows, who represents western North Carolina, convinced 79 of his colleagues to sign on to the letter, and he led a group of 40 lawmakers demanding that Obamacare funding be stripped from any continuing resolution approved by the House.

“It is time that we stop acting like loyal subjects and start acting like the representatives that we were voted into office to uphold,” Meadows said.

Watch the video posted Sept. 29, 2013, on YouTube:

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[Image via YouTube]


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‘None of this is normal’: Maddow revolted by child sex trafficking charges against Trump pal George Nader

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MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow connected the dots between the President Donald Trump's administration and George Nader, who served time for child pornography prior to Trump's 2016 campaign and has subsequently been arrested on child sex trafficking charges.

"In what is an astonishingly scandal-ridden presidency, populated by an astonishingly strange cast of characters, he remains one of the most unsettling figures in all of Trump world. Again, to be clear, to disambiguate here, we are not talking about Jeffrey Epstein, seen here with the president, who is also now in custody awaiting child sex trafficking charges," Maddow explained. "No, this is a whole different guy who you can see in this picture with the president who is now in federal custody awaiting a different set of sex trafficking charges as well as serious child porn charges and not for the first time."

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Fox News hires former Trump spokesman as Senior Vice President: report

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The revolving door between the White House and Fox News was spinning on Friday as a former spokesman for President Donald Trump was hired by Fox News.

"A bit of news: Raj Shah, the former spokesman in the White House, is joining Fox as a senior Vice President," Washington Post White House correspondent Josh Dawsey reported on Friday.

https://twitter.com/jdawsey1/status/1152374273522241537

After Hope Hicks left her job as White House communications director, she was hired to lead corporate communications for New Fox, the parent company of Fox News.

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Here’s why President Trump’s explicit racism is an impeachable offense

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Without even waiting for former special counsel Robert Mueller to testify about President Donald Trump's obstruction of justice, Democrats are legally justified in acting now to impeach the president for his explicit racism, a civil rights activist argued on Friday.

Journalist and author Shaun King laid out his argument in a column published by The Intercept.

To make his argument, King explained the difference between implicit and explicit racism.

"Across the country, corporations and government agencies, including police departments, are offering a wave of what’s called 'implicit bias training.' The fundamental theory is that, in this country, otherwise well-meaning employees can be racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, or xenophobic in ways that they may not really even be aware of," he explained. "It’s the notion that people unknowingly or unconsciously discriminate against others."

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