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AL Natural Resources board unanimously sides with NRA to approve hunting with silencers

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Hunters in Alabama will soon be able to kill their prey without disturbing neighbors thanks to rules that allow the use silencers on weapons.

In a unanimous vote last week, Alabama’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Board agreed that hunters should be able to begin to start using suppressed weapons as early as next fall.

“When someone is hunting around an urban area, it will allow that to take place without bothering people nearby,” Department of Conservation wildlife and freshwater fisheries director Fred Harders explained. “And it can help with damage to the ear, especially with young people.”

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The National Rifle Association applauded Alabama for taking steps to become one of more than 30 states that allow hunting with silencers.

But hunter Matthew Eslick told WHNT that suppressors did more harm than good.

“I think it’s a complete and utter outrage,” Eslick remarked. “As a law-abiding hunter, there is no need.”

“When you’re hunting big game, you’re using calibers that are well faster than the speed of sound. So, there’s no positive side to using a silencer other than no body knows that you are anywhere around,” he said, adding that the new rules would lead to more poaching.

“True hunters, as they are, are actually conservationists,” Eslick explained. “When you make it easier for people to go against all the other laws that are set in place to help better the deer herds, to help better turkey populations, you’re essentially negating all conservation.”

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The policy is expected to pass administrative review, and take effect in late June.

Watch the video below from WHNT, broadcast May 9, 2014.

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Watch the video below from Al.com.

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[Hunter with scoped rifle via Shutterstock.com]


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