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CNN legal analyst explodes over ‘inherent’ police racism: ‘This is what it’s like to be a black person’

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The case of a police using a Taser on a young African-American car passenger became personal for CNN legal analyst Sunny Hostin on Tuesday when her colleague, Paul Callan, tried to claim that abuses of power did not have a racial component.

CNN’s Susan Candiotti reported that an Indiana family was suing the Hammond police department for a Sept. 25 traffic stop that ended with officers breaking a passenger-side window and tasing Jamal Jones because he would not produce an ID.

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Callan said that police had mishandled the case, but predicted that the city would prevail.

“The cops screwed up here, there are kids in the back seat, they should have handled it differently,” he remarked. “But the law, I think, will back them… Because you have an obligation to produce identification. If they tell you get out of the car, get out of the car.”

The entire time that Candiotti and Callan were discussing the case, Hostin could be seen quietly seething on the panel.

“Sunny, I have also been told that as a single female driving on a road that if I see someone trying to pull me over, I have the right to continue to a populated area,” CNN host Ashleigh Banfield noted. “Because if I am in fear, I don’t have to stop on a road in the dark. Is this the same kind of fear? These people were afraid.”

“Of course, they were afraid,” Hostin said. “And I’ve got to tell you I’m so upset. I think actually Paul is correct [about his prediction], but this is the hazard of being a black person in the United States today! I mean, there’s a family in a car and they are completely complying. You see that [the mother] has called 911. He isn’t even driving the vehicle. He has provided several pieces of paper as identification.”

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“This family was tortured for over 13 minutes. Those children were traumatized. And guess what? The law as it stands right now probably protects the police officers’ actions.”

“And as a woman of color, I don’t know what to do!” Hostin exclaimed in frustration. “Because this could happen to me, this could happen to my child, this could happen to my father, this could happen to my husband. What do we do about the inherent racism over and over and over again in these United States during these traffic stops!”

At that point, Callan tried to argue that there was “no evidence” that the traffic stop was a race-based incident.

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“Give me a break!” Hostin shot back. “This is about race. Give me a break, Paul.”

“If this was a white family, this would have happened,” Callan interrupted.

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“This would not have happened!” Hostin said.

“You have no idea,” Callan replied.

“I do have an idea,” Hostin insisted. “Because I live in the United States and I’m the person I am.”

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“To turn everything into a racial issue…” Callan complained.

“It’s not everything, but this is! This is!” Hostin said. “If you were with your family in your car, this would not have happened. Period.”

“I think you’re both right,” Banfield concluded. “You both have a lot of merit in what you said.”

Watch the video below from CNN, broadcast Oct. 7, 2014.

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Fresno city councilman accuses colleague of ‘bullying and abusive behavior’ over rule mandating COVID-19 masks

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During a press conference on Thursday, a Fresno City Council member railed at one his colleagues for a proposal -- since passed -- that would require members to wear masks during meetings.

According to Councilmember Garry Bredefeld he finds the masks -- used to stem the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus -- "uncomfortable" and he feels he is being bullied by fellow Councilmember Miguel Arias.

Addressing the resolution to mandate wearing masks, Bredefeld told reporters that Arias, "Put on the agenda was it just the latest example of a pattern for him that includes bullying, abusive, belligerent and bullying behavior."

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Defense secretary throws Trump under the bus: ‘I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act’

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Secretary of Defense Mark Esper on Wednesday seemed to be at odds with President Donald Trump when it comes to invoking the Insurrection Act to quell protests over the killing of George Floyd.

Esper explained at a press conference that members of the National Guard had been deployed to keep order "in support of local law enforcement."

"The option to use active duty forces should only be used as a matter of last resort and only in the most urgent and dire of situations," he explained. "We are not in one of those situations now."

"I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act," Esper insisted, referencing Trump's threat to use the law against protesters.

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Trump claims he was rushed to White House bunker only for ‘inspection’ — not fear of protesters

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President Donald Trump on Wednesday insisted that fear of protesters did not prompt him to be ushered into a White House bunker. Instead, the president said that he visited the facility for an "inspection."

During a Fox News radio interview with host Brian Kilmeade, Trump again threatened to use military forces against protesters.

“If they don’t get their act straightened out I will solve it. I’ll solve it fast,” he said.

The president also pushed back against the narrative that he was "hiding in a White House bunker" as protesters demonstrated outside.

"They said it would be a good time to go down and take a look because maybe sometime you’re going to need it," the president said, adding that the visit was more of an "inspection."

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