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Experimental Ebola vaccine triggers few side effects, hospital says

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An experimental vaccine against the deadly Ebola virus has provoked only mild side effects in volunteers in Switzerland, a Geneva hospital said Tuesday.

“To date, no major side effects have been observed after the injections,” the Geneva University Hospital (HUG) said in a statement.

The hospital is one of several worldwide hosting trials of the experimental VSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine, manufactured by the Public Health Agency of Canada and licensed by U.S. firm NewLink Genetics.

It said 34 of the 115 volunteers taking part in the clinical trial had already received injections with either VSV-ZEBOV or with a placebo.

“Observations and initial analysis showed that vaccinated volunteers responded with an inflammatory reaction, precisely as expected,” HUG said.

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“These lasted from a few hours to two to three days, with mild fever in certain cases and no major side effects,” it added.

The clinical trial will continue into early 2015, with around 15 volunteers receiving an injection each week.

There is no licensed treatment or vaccine for Ebola and the World Health Organization has endorsed rushing potential ones through trials in a bid to stem the epidemic, raging mainly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

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Some 6,000 people have died so far in the outbreak that began less than a year ago.

The VSV-ZEBOV vaccine is also being tested on volunteers in the United States, Canada, Germany and Gabon, and clinical trials are also due to start soon in Kenya.

HUG said it was seeking volunteers who will be traveling to the west African countries most affected by the Ebola outbreak.

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“These volunteers will not receive a placebo for ethical reasons,” it said.

Another Swiss hospital, the CHUV in Lausanne, is also conducting trials of another experimental vaccine, made by Britain’s GlaxoSmithKine.

Trials of that vaccine are also underway in Mali, Britain and the United States.


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Trump’s racism is ‘disqualifying’ for him to remain as president: former White House lawyer

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Former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal explained on MSNBC on Thursday why he viewed President Donald Trump's racist attacks on four women of color in Congress as disqualifying.

Anchor Brian Williams read a quote from Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

"Half of the country is appalled but not really sure how to combat him; the other half is cheering, or at least averting its gaze. This is what a political civil war looks like, with words, for now, as weapons," Glasser wrote.

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Lawrence O’Donnell reports on the growing movement for the impeachment of President Donald Trump

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Anchor Lawrence O'Donnell reported on the growing movement for the impeachment of President Donald Trump during Thursday evening's "The Last Word" on MSNBC.

"The House of Representatives conducted a symbolic vote on a hastily written impeachment resolution by Democratic Congressman Al Green in reaction to the president’s tweeted comments that the House of Representatives voted to condemn as racist," O'Donnell reported. "The impeachment resolution had nothing to do with the [Robert] Mueller investigation and referred only to the president being unfit for office because of the language that he has used recently about members of Congress and immigrants and asylum seekers."

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Video proves how far the Trump’s GOP has gone from the era of Ronald Reagan and HW Bush

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The immigration policies of Donald Trump’s presidency would have no room for his GOP predecessors Ronald Reagan or George H.W. Bush—who both embraced work visas, family unification, easy border crossings and a better relationship with Mexico.

That counterpoint can be seen in a very short video clip from the 1980 presidential election where Reagan and Bush—who became Reagan’s vice president for two terms before winning the presidency in 1988—were asked about immigration at a campaign debate in Texas. Their responses show just how far to the right the Republican Party’s current leader, President Trump, and voters who have not left the GOP to become self-described political independents, have moved on immigration.

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